Tagonoura stable (2013)

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Tagonoura stable 2014 1.JPG
Tagonoura stable 2014 2.JPG

Tagonoura stable (田子ノ浦部屋, Tagonoura-beya), formerly Naruto stable is a stable of sumo wrestlers, one of the Nishonoseki group of stables.

The stable was established on 1 February 1989 by former yokozuna Takanosato Toshihide. The stable's first sekitori was Rikio in 1994. Four more, Wakanosato, Takanowaka, Takayasu and Kisenosato, have reached sekiwake rank, with Takayasu and Kisenosato going on to reach the ōzeki and yokozuna ranks respectively in 2017. It had a reputation for being a close, family-knit stable, as Naruto did not allow his wrestlers to go out and train at other stables (which is unusual in sumo) or socialize with wrestlers from different stables.[1]

Naruto died suddenly on 7 November 2011. The stable's current master, former maegashira Takanotsuru, changed to the Tagonoura toshiyori in December 2013 and renamed the stable accordingly.[2] Upon changing the stable name, the stable was also moved to the Ryōgoku area from Matsudo, Chiba. It has no connection to the defunct Tagonoura stable established by the late Kushimaumi. As of the January 2018 tournament it had 12 wrestlers. Five of them are new recruits who joined for the March 2017 tournament.

Ring name conventions[edit]

Many wrestlers at this stable have taken ring names or shikona that end with the character 里 (read: sato), in deference to their coach and the stable's owner, the deceased former Takanosato.

Owners[edit]

Notable active wrestlers[edit]

Notable former members[edit]

Referees[edit]

  • Kimura Takao (jūryō gyōji, real name Keiichirō Shigeyama)
  • Kimura Takanosuke (makushita gyōji, real name Satoru Ishimaru)

Usher[edit]

  • Mitsuaki (jūryō yobidashi, real name Mitsuaki Kanai)

Hairdresser[edit]

Location and access[edit]

Tokyo, Edogawa ward, Higashi Koiwa 4-9-20
10 minute walk from Koiwa Station on the Sōbu Line

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gunning, John (31 May 2017). "Takayasu's rise built on solid family support". Japan Times. Retrieved 1 June 2017. 
  2. ^ Miki, Shuji (17 June 2017). "SUMO ABC (53) / A stable where notable rikishi were steeped in sumo's fundamentals". The Japan News. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 

External links[edit]