Taibuga

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Taibuga, the first Khan of the Khanate of Sibir, came to power in the 15th century as a result of the power vacuum caused by the breakup of the Mongolian Empire. Some legendary accounts identify him as a noble from Bukhara and associate him with the conversion of Sibir to Islam.[1]

The facts of his reign remain relatively unclear, but it appears he was a shamanist.[2] Taibuga is said[by whom?] to have driven the forces of Novgorod from his land.[3] He is also at times spoken of[by whom?] as the ancestor not just of the Khans but of the whole ruling elite of Sibir.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Frank, Allen J. (2012). Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia: Sufism, Education, and the Paradox of Islamic Prestige. Brill's Inner Asian Library. Brill. p. 37. ISBN 9789004234901. Retrieved 2015-10-12. In the historical legends of the Siberian Tatars the two Muslim dynasties that pre-dated the Russian conquest are linked explicitly to Bukhara. [...S]everal accounts in West Siberian Turkic manuscripts relate an account of the history of the dynasty that Kuchum displaced, the Taybughids. These legends [...] state that the founder of the Taybughid dynasty, Taybugha Biy, came from Bukhara, and was the son of a ruler there. Taybugha Biy brought a number of religious scholars with him, and they were responsible for the Islamization of Siberia. 
  2. ^ History of the Mongols: The so-called Tartars of Russia and Central Asia. 2 v. History of the Mongols: The so-called Tartars of Russia and Central Asia. Longmans, Green, and Company. 1880. Retrieved 2 July 2008. 
  3. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia: Siberia. The Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company. 1912. Retrieved 2 July 2008. 
  4. ^ James Forsyth (1994). A History of the Peoples of Siberia: Russia's North Asian Colony 1581-1990-James Forsyth-Google Books. A History of the Peoples of Siberia: Russia's North Asian Colony 1581-1990. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521477710. Retrieved 2 July 2008.