Talk:Affinity diagram

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KJ method? Occurs to me this may be a typo considering his name is Jiro Kawakita (JK)[edit]

The affinity diagram was devised by Jiro Kawakita in the 1960s[3] and is sometimes referred to as the KJ Method.

No, KJ is correct. Because Japanese natively put family names before personal names, while westerners do the opposite, English texts often reverse the order, and you get this kind of inconsistency. The method is conventionally known as the KJ method. - Snarkibartfast (talk) 10:26, 11 November 2010 (UTC)