Talk:Ingatestone

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Does anyone know how to pronounce Ingatestone properly? I can imagine several ways. Thanks -Willmcw 23:21, May 3, 2005 (UTC)

I lived there 15 years and I noticed 2 main ways... the first seems to be adopted by recent movers as 3 equally weighted syllables IN-GATE-STONE, but alternatively heard is ING-UT'STONE (or perhaps ING-AT'STUN) where the stress is defintitely on the first syllable and the A (or U) is clipped very short (U as in BUT or A as in HAT). An old friend of mine once worked as a telephone operator when they used to connect national calls manually back in the early 1960s before STD (Subscriber Trunk Dialling)... my operator friend asked the elderly caller for his number and the answer kept coming back as "Engaged Tone 012". (In British English, Engaged Tone is what in US english is the Busy Tone). My poor operator friend thought the man was a bit deaf and kept asking the same question and getting the same answer. Eventually the old boy said "Engaged Tone in Essex, are yew stewpid?"... and then the penny dropped ... (or 4d as I think it was in those days).

Thanks very much for that information. I suspected that there might be a particular pronunciation. Cheers, -Willmcw 17:10, May 4, 2005 (UTC)
PS - great story! -W

As a former Ingatestone resident (Mind you, I left when I was 5) I'd say that was about right. When explaining spelling to non-residents one tends to say in-gate-stone, but the 2nd and 3rd syllables tend to get unstressed in common use. Rob Burbidge (talk) 21:07, 17 September 2010 (UTC)

Origins of the name[edit]

Not an academic site by any means, but according to this site: http://www.dooyoo.co.uk/destinations-national/short-breaks-from-london/428329/ the towns name comes from "Meadow (Ing) at the (atte) Milestone (stone)". I've also heard the etymology "Inga's town". I have no idea, myself, but it would be interesting to clarify? Rob Burbidge (talk) 21:07, 17 September 2010 (UTC)

Ingatstone is a village not Town[edit]

Ingastone is not a small town it is a village. It is run by a Parish council, which by definition alone makes it NOT a town. The article refers to by passing the village and the village sign but still refers to ingatestone as a town. I have lived in Ingatestone for 48 years and have checked with much older residents nobody has any recollection of Piero's restaurant ever being called the Haunt. I have even asked two previous owners of the building and no one has any recollection of this name ever appearing in any documentation or deeds. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Mdrrey (talkcontribs) 13:11, 5 July 2011 (UTC)