Talk:Omake

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"In both America and Japan"[edit]

However, in both America and Japan, the anime fandom's use of the word is overshadowed by its everyday meaning of bonus or extra.

Umm... is there any use of the word "omake" in America outside the anime fandom? - furrykef (Talk at me) 15:59, 30 December 2007 (UTC)

There is. The term is oft used the gaming import scene, where omake may appear as a special audio track or high resolution images accessible when put into a computer. Either way, I've added a cite tag to the comment, as it is not sourced and could possibly be Original Research. AtaruMoroboshi (talk) 18:56, 21 February 2008 (UTC)
Yes, OMake is also The OMake build system. --Julesjacobs (talk) 12:52, 11 April 2008 (UTC)
A distinction I would make is pronounced OMake is "O-MAKE" where as Omake "OH-MA-KE" AtaruMoroboshi (talk) 13:38, 11 April 2008 (UTC)

Bleach's "Shinigami" Omake[edit]

Along with the omake definition, does the definition extend to Bleach's "Shinigami Cup Golden"/"Shinigami Illustrated Picture Book" as well? Because these are 30-second comedic scenes at the end of the episode (since episode 59). --65.12.104.186 (talk) 01:22, 16 November 2008 (UTC)

Inconsistent claims[edit]

This article includes both of these:

"In English, the term is often used with this meaning, although it generally only applies to features included with anime, tokusatsu, and occasionally manga. It is thus generally limited to use amongst fans of Japanese pop culture (sometimes called otaku); like many loan words from Japanese, omake is both the singular and plural form."

"However, in both America and Japan, the anime fandom's use of the word is overshadowed by its everyday meaning of bonus or extra."

98.14.84.232 (talk) 03:15, 26 June 2010 (UTC)