Team Tango Foxtrot

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Foxtrot
Team Tango Foxtrot 4 N190KT.jpg
Role Amateur-built aircraft
National origin United States
Manufacturer Team Tango
Status In production (2012)
Number built 3 (2011)
Unit cost
US$45,750 (less engine, 2011)
Developed from Team Tango Tango 2

The Team Tango Foxtrot, or Foxtrot 4, is an American amateur-built aircraft, designed and produced by Team Tango of Williston, Florida. The aircraft is supplied as a kit for amateur construction, with or without factory builder assistance.[1][2]

Design and development[edit]

The Foxtrot was developed as a four-seat version of the Tango 2 and shares many of the two-seater's features. The Foxtrot has a cantilever low-wing, a four-seat enclosed cockpit, fixed tricycle landing gear and a single engine in tractor configuration. The rear seats have limited visibility.[1][2]

The aircraft is made from composites. Its 32 ft (9.8 m) span wing employs a NACA 64-415 airfoil, has an area of 128 sq ft (11.9 m2) and mounts flaps. The engines recommended are Lycoming Engines of 200 to 350 hp (149 to 261 kW).[1][2][3]

Operational history[edit]

By October 2012 three examples had been registered in the United States with the Federal Aviation Administration.[2][4]

Specifications (Foxtrot)[edit]

Data from Bayerl[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Capacity: three passenger
  • Wingspan: 32 ft 0 in (9.75 m)
  • Wing area: 128 sq ft (11.9 m2)
  • Airfoil: NACA 64-415
  • Empty weight: 1,398 lb (634 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2,579 lb (1,170 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 110 U.S. gallons (420 L; 92 imp gal)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming O-540 six cylinder, air-cooled, four stroke aircraft engine, 350 hp (260 kW)
  • Propellers: 3-bladed constant speed

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 229 mph; 199 kn (368 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 216 mph; 188 kn (348 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 57 mph; 50 kn (92 km/h)
  • Rate of climb: 2,400 ft/min (12 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 20.1 lb/sq ft (98.3 kg/m2)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Bayerl, Robby; Martin Berkemeier; et al: World Directory of Leisure Aviation 2011-12, page 123. WDLA UK, Lancaster UK, 2011. ISSN 1368-485X
  2. ^ a b c d Vandermeullen, Richard: 2012 Kit Aircraft Buyer's Guide, Kitplanes, Volume 28, Number 12, December 2011, page 71. Belvoir Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  3. ^ Lednicer, David (2010). "The Incomplete Guide to Airfoil Usage". Retrieved 3 January 2012.
  4. ^ Federal Aviation Administration (24 October 2012). "Make / Model Inquiry Results". Retrieved 24 October 2012.

External links[edit]