Technomimetics

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A Molecular Gearing System.[1]

Technomimetics are molecular systems that can mimic man-made devices. The term was first introduced in 1997.[1] The current set of technomimetic molecules[2] includes motors,[3] rotors,[4] gears,[5] gyroscopes,[6] tweezers,[7] and other molecular devices. Technomimetics can be considered as the essential components of molecular machines and have the primary use in molecular nanotechnology.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gakh, A.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; and Bryan, J.C. Molecular gearing systems. ChemTech, 1997, 27(11), 26-33.
  2. ^ Rapenne, G. Synthesis of technomimetic molecules: Towards rotation control in single molecular machines and motors. Org. Biomol. Chem. 2005, 3, 1165-1169. doi:10.1039/b419282f
  3. ^ Fletcher, S. P.; Dumur, F.; Pollard, M. M.; Feringa, B. L. A Reversible, Unidirectional Molecular Rotary Motor Driven by Chemical Energy. Science, 2005, 310(5745), 80-82. doi: 10.1126/science.1117090
  4. ^ Kottas, G.S.; Clarke, L. I.; Horinek, D.; Michl, J. Artificial molecular rotors. Chem. Rev. 2005, 105, 1281-1376. doi: 10.1021/cr0300993
  5. ^ Manzano, C.; Soe, W.-H.; Wong, H. S.; Ample, F.; Gourdon, A.; Chandrasekhar, N.; Joachim, C. Step-by-step rotation of a molecule-gear mounted on an atomic-scale axis. Nature Materials, 2009, 8, 576-579. doi: 10.1038/NMAT2467
  6. ^ Shima, T.; Hampel, F.; Gladysz, J.A. Molecular Gyroscopes: Fe(CO)3 and Fe(CO)2-(NO)+ Rotators Encased in Three-Spoke Stators; Facile Assembly via Alkene Metatheses. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2004, 43, 5537-5540. doi: 10.1002/anie.200460534
  7. ^ Chen C.-W.; Whitlock H. W. Molecular Tweezers - A Simple-Model of Bifunctional Intercalation. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1978, 100, 4921–4922. doi: 10.1021/ja00483a063

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