Terry Lane

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For the American R and B singer, see Terry Lane (musician).

Terry Lane is a radio broadcaster and newspaper columnist based in Melbourne, Australia.

He was born in South Australia and was educated at Gawler High School. After studying for the ministry at the Churches of Christ College of the Bible in Melbourne, Lane was a minister for six years before working in the Methodist Department of Christian Education and the ABC's religious department. He began a radio talk-back program for the ABC in Melbourne in 1977, but was controversially sacked after eleven months.

The Monash Biographical Dictionary of 20th Century Australia describes Lane as "a capable and empathetic interviewer, though often expounding controversial views".[1] Geraldine Doogue has called him "an interviewer's interviewer; he's self-effacing, but probing, and these days [2005], certainly not afraid of expressing his own opinions. He's gloriously unpredictable, offends listeners of both liberal and conservative inclinations, and delights just as many others."[2]

Lane is probably best known for his daily radio program, which ran from 1982 to 1993 on 3LO, 2BL, 7ZR and 2NC. In 1995, he returned to the ABC's Radio National to present a weekly program, the National Interest,[3] from which he retired in 2005.

He published a collection of his interviews with famous Australians about their childhood experiences in As the Twig is Bent (1979) and is also the author of More than Meets the Ear (1987), Hobbyhorses (1990), and God: The Interview (1993, second edition 2004). In 1993 he published his first novel, Hectic, which was followed by Tit for Tat (1994), and Sparrows Fall (1995). The First Century, a history of Australia's Federal elections co-authored with Doug Aiton, was published in June 2000.

Since 2003 he has reviewed digital photography hardware and software for The Age and the Sydney Morning Herald a position from which he retired in December 2016. His reviews are published online at dpexpert.com.au.

Lane was secretary of the anti-censorship organisation Free Speech Victoria. He also is the winner of the Wilkie Medal, awarded by the Anti-Football League for doing the least for Australian rules football in the best and fairest manner.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Monash Biographical Dictionary of 20th Century Australia.
  2. ^ "Terry Lane Retires," ABC Radio National, 17 December 2005. Retrieved 3 April 2015.
  3. ^ The National Interest, ABC Radio National. Retrieved 3 April 2015

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