Teston Bridge

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Teston Bridge
Photograph of Teston Bridge, Kent
Teston Bridge
Coordinates51°15′11″N 0°26′50″E / 51.252985°N 0.447302°E / 51.252985; 0.447302Coordinates: 51°15′11″N 0°26′50″E / 51.252985°N 0.447302°E / 51.252985; 0.447302
CarriesB2163
CrossesRiver Medway
LocaleTeston / West Farleigh
OwnerKent County Council
Maintained byKent County Council
Heritage statusGrade I listed, also a
Scheduled ancient monument
Preceded byBow Bridge, Wateringbury
Followed byBarming Bridge
Characteristics
MaterialRagstone
No. of spansSix
Piers in waterThree
History
Construction end14th or 15th century
Teston Bridge is located in Kent
Teston Bridge
Teston Bridge
Location in Kent

Teston Bridge is a road bridge across the River Medway, between Teston and West Farleigh in Kent, England.

History[edit]

Detail on Teston Bridge.jpg

The bridge was constructed in the 14th or 15th century and comprises six arches of various heights and widths, the middle three of which span the river.[1]

Three of the arches were rebuilt at the beginning of the 19th century and the parapet may also have been rebuilt. The bridge is a Grade I listed building and a scheduled ancient monument.[1][2]

Description[edit]

Teston Bridge is built of coursed rag-stone with ashlar capping stones to the parapets. The bridge is narrow, only wide enough to permit traffic to pass in one direction at a time and the parapets feature pedestrian refuges continued up from the cutwaters on each side.[1] It carries the B2163 road, which is crossed on the level by the Medway Valley Line just west of the bridge. The crossing was the site of Teston Crossing Halt,[3] which was open from 1909–59.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Historic England. "Teston Bridge (1262983)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 July 2011.
  2. ^ Historic England. "Teston Bridge (415865)". PastScape. Retrieved 15 January 2012.
  3. ^ Sheet 172 (Map). 1:63,360. Ordnance Survey. 1940. Retrieved 2 July 2011.
  4. ^ Kidner, R. W. (1985). Southern Railway Halts. Survey and Gazetteer. Headington, Oxford: The Oakwood Press. p. 57. ISBN 0-85361-321-4.