The Foundation for Young Australians

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The Foundation for Young Australians
Motto Unleash the world. Create a better future.
Formation 1977
Type NGO
Purpose Improving learning and life opportunities for young Australians
Headquarters Melbourne
Region served
Australia
Chief Executive Officer
Jan Owen
Main organ
Board of Directors
Affiliations Department of Education and Training
Website fya.org.au

The Foundation for Young Australians (or FYA) is an Australian non-profit organisation committed to creating generational transformation by improving the learning outcomes and life opportunities of young Australians. Projects of the foundation include the Safe Schools Coalition Australia and publishing research.

The organisation aims to foster young people's education and social participation.[1]

History[edit]

Tracing back to 1977, FYA has a history of partnering with individuals, organisations and schools. FYA was formed in 2000 through a partnership between The Queen’s Trust (1977-2000) and the Australian Youth Foundation (1987-2000), with the objectives of providing increased opportunity and access for young people of disadvantaged backgrounds, and supporting the leadership development of young Australians.

In July 2008 an alliance was formed between Education Foundation and FYA. The Education Foundation was founded in 1989 by Ellen Koshland with the aim of developing and delivering education programs, community engagement and research to Australian students. The partnership was the result of a bold aspiration shared by the two Boards to establish FYA as the pre-eminent advocate for young Australians.[2]

in 2010, FYA shifted direction, under the leadership of Jan Owen, from a funding body to an initiative incubation space. The initiatives FYA now develops with partners are focused on education and social change.[3]

The FYA publishes an annual report called "How Young People are Faring".[4] In 2012, the FYA calculated that 30% of student who left high school in Year 9 or below were NEET.[5]

A 2014 report by the FYA found that people under the age of 24 were likely to be worse off than their parents, with a 30% unemployment rate and more university debt and spending most income on housing.[6] The report was titled How Young People Are Faring and was written in conjunction with Professor Stephen Lamb from the University of Melbourne.

Initiatives[edit]

The Foundation for Young Australians (FYA) develops and delivers initiatives that foster engagement in learning, access and equity while linking to schools and communities across Australia.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Walsh, Lucas; Rosalyn Black; Naomi Berman. "Walking the Walk: Youth Research in Hard Times". In Riele, Kitty Te; Brooks, Rachel. Negotiating Ethical Challenges in Youth Research: Critical youth studies. Routledge. p. 43. ISBN 0415808464. Retrieved 22 September 2016. 
  2. ^ "Our history". Foundation for Young Australians. Archived from the original on 15 August 2009. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  3. ^ "Jan Owen". Philanthropy Australia. Archived from the original on 29 November 2012. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  4. ^ Young people unprepared for evolving labour market. PM. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 22 September 2016.
  5. ^ Neil, Selwyn (2007). "Technology, schools and citizen education:a fix too far". In Loader, Brian D. Young Citizens in the Digital Age: Political Engagement, Young People and New Media. Routledge. p. 134. ISBN 1134131577. Retrieved 22 September 2016. 
  6. ^ Youth today could be first Australian generation worse-off than parents. RN Breakfast. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 22 September 2016.
  7. ^ "FYA Initiatives". Foundation for Young Australians. Retrieved 6 August 2012. [dead link]
  8. ^ "Centre for New Public Education". Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  9. ^ "Change It Up". Foundation for Young Australians. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  10. ^ "High Resolves". Foundation for Young Australians. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  11. ^ "IMPACT Indigenous Program". Foundation for Young Australians. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  12. ^ "NAB Schools First". Foundation for Young Australians. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  13. ^ "Centre for Public Education". Foundation for Young Australians. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  14. ^ "Worlds of Work". Foundation for Young Australians. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  15. ^ "Worlds of Worlds". Foundation for Young Australians. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  16. ^ "Young Social Pioneers". Foundation for Young Australians. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 

External links[edit]