The Four-Way Test

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The Four-Way Test of the things we think, say or do is a test used by Rotarians world-wide as a moral code for personal and business relationships. The test can be applied to almost any aspect of life.[1] The test was scripted by Herbert J. Taylor an American from Chicago as he set out to save the Club Aluminum Products Distribution Company from bankruptcy. It was later adopted by Rotary International, the global federation of Rotary service clubs.[2]

Genesis[edit]

In the early 1930s Herbert J. Taylor set out to save the Club Aluminum Products distribution company from bankruptcy. He believed himself to be the only person in the company with 250 employees who had hope. His recovery plan started with changing the ethical climate of the company. He explained:

Adoption of the test by Rotary[edit]

In the 1940s, when Taylor was an international director of Rotary, he offered the Four Way Test to the organization, and it was adopted by Rotary for its internal and promotional use. Never changed, the twenty four word test remains today a central part of the permanent Rotary structure throughout the world, and is held as the standard by which all behaviour should be measured. The test has been promoted around the world and is used in myriad forms to encourage personal and business ethical practices.[3] Taylor gave Rotary International the right to use the test in the 1940s and the copyright in 1954. He retained the rights to use the test for himself, his Club Aluminum Company and the Christian Workers Foundation. [4]

Use by the Ghanaian judicial system[edit]

The test is displayed on billboards in court premises in Ghana.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stadalsky, Kris (2011-06-26). "Rotary’s Four-Way Test a good life tool". The Herald-News. CHICAGO SUN-TIMES. Retrieved 2011-07-04. 
  2. ^ "About us". THE 4 WAY TEST ASSOCIATION. The 4-Way Test Association, Inc. Retrieved 2011-07-02. 
  3. ^ a b "Herbert Taylor". ANBHF Laureate program. The American National Business Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2014-08-20. 
  4. ^ "Rotary International Presidents". RGHF - Internet project. Rotary Global History Fellowship. Retrieved 2011-07-02. 
  5. ^ Mensah, Mary (2011-06-18). "Don't Compromise Justice System - Chief Justice". Graphicghana.com. Graphic Communications Group Ltd. Retrieved 2011-07-03. 

External links[edit]