The Nephilim (album)

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The Nephilim
Thenephilim.jpg
Studio album by Fields of the Nephilim
Released September 1988
Recorded 1988
Genre Gothic rock
Length 55:23
Label Situation Two/Beggars Banquet
Producer Fields of the Nephilim
Fields of the Nephilim chronology
Dawnrazor
(1987)Dawnrazor1987
The Nephilim
(1988)
Elizium
(1990)Elizium1990
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic4.5/5 stars[1]
Pitchfork Media(6.4/10.0)[2]

The Nephilim is the second studio album by Fields of the Nephilim, was released in September 1988 by Situation Two/Beggars Banquet Records.[3] The record debuted at number 12 in the UK album charts.[4][5]

The album was recorded in The Justice Rooms, a former courthouse in England’s Somerset countryside where defendants who were sentenced to death were hanged on site. “The place had a really cool vibe,” recalls bassist Tony Pettitt.[6]

The Nephilim’s opening track, “Endemoniada," shares its name with a 1968 Mexican horror film, and features a man growling “penitentziagitae!,” sampled from Ron Perlman's hunchback character, Salvatore, in The Name of the Rose.[6] The album's top-charting single, "Moonchild," shares its name with Aleister Crowley's novel, while "Love Under Will" is a phrase for Crowley's Book of the Law.[6] The lyrics for "The Watchman" and "Last Exit for the Lost" reference H. P. Lovecraft's character Cthulhu.[6]

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Endemoniada" – 7:15
  2. "The Watchman" – 5:31
  3. "Phobia" – 3:37
  4. "Moonchild" – 5:40
  5. "Chord of Souls" – 5:08
  6. "Shiva" – 4:50
  7. "Celebrate" – 6:23
  8. "Love Under Will" – 7:08
  9. "Last Exit for the Lost" – 9:42

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allmusic review
  2. ^ Pitchfork Media review
  3. ^ Sutherland, Steve (3 September 1988). "The Living Dead". Melody Maker. London: IPC: 30. ISSN 0025-9012. 
  4. ^ Jungle Records: FotN Biography
  5. ^ Metropolis Records: FotN Biography
  6. ^ a b c d "Celebrate: Fields of the Nephilim's 'The Nephilim' at 25". PopMatters. Retrieved 2 November 2015. 

External links[edit]