The Orange and the Green

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
"The Orange and the Green"
Song
LanguageEnglish
GenreIrish folk
Songwriter(s)Anthony Murphy

"The Orange and the Green" or "The Biggest Mix-Up" is a humorous Irish folk song about a man whose father was a Protestant ("Orange") and whose mother was a Catholic ("Green"). It describes the man's trials as the product of religious intermarriage and how "mixed up" he became as a result of such an upbringing.

This song was written by Anthony Murphy of Liverpool, and has been recorded by bands such as The Irish Rovers, The Wolfe Tones, Paddy Reilly, and the Brobdingnagian Bards, among others. It is sung to the same tune as "The Wearing of the Green", which is also used in "The Rising of the Moon", another Irish ballad.

History[edit]

Liverpool, home to a great many Irish immigrants, has a large number of Catholics. On the other hand, the Protestant Orange Order is also very strong. The Orange Lodge marches every year in July, with bands of fifes, drums and bagpipes, to celebrate the victory of Protestant King William of Orange over Catholic King James II, on 12 July 1690.

See also[edit]