There! I've Said It Again

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"There! I've Said It Again"
Single by Bobby Vinton
from the album There! I've Said It Again
B-side"The Girl with the Bow in Her Hair"
ReleasedNovember 7, 1963
FormatVinyl record (7" 45 RPM)
Recorded1963
GenrePop
Length2:23
LabelEpic
Songwriter(s)Redd Evans, David Mann
Producer(s)Bob Morgan
Bobby Vinton singles chronology
"Blue Velvet"
(1963)
"There! I've Said It Again"
(1963)
"My Heart Belongs to Only You"
(1964)

"There! I've Said It Again" is a popular song written by Redd Evans and David Mann, and popularized originally by Vaughn Monroe in 1945,[1] and then again in late 1963 and early 1964 by Bobby Vinton. Vinton's version was the final number one song on the Hot 100 prior to the Beatles. The song charted at No. 1 on January 4, 1964 for four weeks.

1945 versions[edit]

Vaughn Monroe's version of "There! I've Said It Again" reached No. 1 on Billboard's chart of "Records Most-Played on the Air",[2] while reaching No. 2 on Billboard's charts of "Best-Selling Popular Retail Records" and "Most-Played Juke Box Records".[3][4]

Jimmy Dorsey released a version of "There! I've Said It Again" in 1945, which reached No. 8 on Billboard's chart of "Records Most-Played on the Air"[5] and No. 12 on Billboard's chart of "Most-Played Juke Box Records".[4] A version was also released by The Modernaires with Paula Kelly in 1945, which was a hit that year.[6]

Bobby Vinton version[edit]

Bobby Vinton released the most widely successful version of "There! I've Said It Again" as a single in 1963.[7] In 1964, Vinton released the song on the album There! I've Said It Again.[8]

Vinton's version topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart on January 4, 1964 and remained there for four weeks.[9][10] It was the first No. 1 song of 1964, and spent 13 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[9] The song also spent five weeks atop the Billboard Middle-Road Singles chart.[11][12] It was Vinton's third number-one song on both charts, following "Roses Are Red (My Love)" and "Blue Velvet".[9][13] Vinton's version also reached No. 1 on the Cash Box Top 100,[14] No. 1 on New Zealand's "Lever Hit Parade",[15] No. 5 on Canada's CHUM Hit Parade,[16] and spent 10 weeks on the United Kingdom's Record Retailer chart, reaching No. 34.[17]

Vinton's version was ranked No. 12 on Cash Box's "Top 100 Chart Hits of 1964".[18]

Other versions[edit]

Nat King Cole and his trio recorded a fine jazz-pop version of it in 1947.

Sam Cooke released a version of the song in 1959. Cooke's version spent five weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, reaching No. 81,[19] while reaching No. 25 on Billboard's Hot R&B Sides chart.[20][21]

Bert Kaempfert and orchestra in 1960 recorded an instrumental version of this as well for the album Dancing In Wonderland.

Al Saxon released a version of the song in 1961, which reached No. 48 on the United Kingdom's Record Retailer chart.[22]

Al Hirt released a version on his 1965 album, They're Playing Our Song.[23]

A cover by Mickey Gilley peaked at No. 53 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart in 1989.[24]

Merle Haggard covered the song on his 1985 album Kern River.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gilliland, John (1994). Pop Chronicles the 40s: The Lively Story of Pop Music in the 40s (audiobook). ISBN 978-1-55935-147-8. OCLC 31611854. Tape 1, side B.
  2. ^ "Records Most-Played on the Air", Billboard, May 26, 1945. p. 23. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  3. ^ "Best-Selling Popular Retail Records", Billboard, June 16, 1945. p. 24. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  4. ^ a b "Most-Played Juke Box Records", Billboard, June 23, 1945. p. 25. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  5. ^ "Records Most-Played on the Air", Billboard, July 14, 1945. p. 21. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  6. ^ "Records Most-Played on the Air", Billboard, July 21, 1945. p. 21. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  7. ^ "Epic Making Small Chunk of Its History", Billboard, November 23, 1963. p. 4. Accessed October 13, 2015
  8. ^ "There! I've Said It Again – Bobby Vinton". AllMusic. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  9. ^ a b c Hot 100 - Bobby Vinton There! I've Said It Again Chart History, Billboard.com. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  10. ^ Joel Whitburn, "The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits", Billboard Publications, Inc., 1987. p. 316
  11. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2002). Top Adult Contemporary: 1961-2001. Record Research. p. 250.
  12. ^ "Middle-Road Singles", Billboard, January 25, 1964. p. 60. Accessed October 13, 2015
  13. ^ Bobby Vinton - Chart History - Adult Contemporary, Billboard.com. Accessed October 13, 2015
  14. ^ "Cash Box Top 100", Cash Box, January 4, 1964. p. 4. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  15. ^ "Lever Hit Parade" 06-Feb-1964, Flavour of New Zealand. Accessed October 13, 2015
  16. ^ "CHUM Chart Archives - Bobby Vinton". CHUM. Archived from the original on July 16, 2006. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  17. ^ Bobby Vinton - Full Official Chart History, Official Charts Company. Accessed October 13, 2015
  18. ^ "Top 100 Chart Hits of 1964", Cash Box, December 26, 1964. p. 12. Accessed July 28, 2016.
  19. ^ Hot 100 - Sam Cooke There, I've Said It Again Chart History, Billboard.com. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  20. ^ Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs - Sam Cooke There, I've Said It Again Chart History, Billboard.com. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  21. ^ "Hot R&B Sides", Billboard, November 23, 1959. p. 48. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  22. ^ Al Saxon - Full Official Chart History, Official Charts Company. Accessed October 13, 2015
  23. ^ Al Hirt, They're Playing Our Song Retrieved April 13, 2013.
  24. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2013). Hot Country Songs 1944–2012. Record Research, Inc. p. 131. ISBN 978-0-89820-203-8.