Tokusegawa Masanao

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Tokusegawa Masanao
德瀬川 正直
Tokusegawa 2010 Jan.JPG
Personal information
Born Badamsambuu Ganbold
(1983-08-06) August 6, 1983 (age 34)
Ulan Bator, Mongolia
Height 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in)
Weight 154 kg (340 lb; 24.3 st)
Career
Stable Asahiyama (formerly Kiriyama)
Record 223-163-9
Debut July 2003
Highest rank Maegashira 1 (May 2011)
Retired April 2011
Championships 1 (Makushita)
1 (Sandanme)
* Up to date as of Jan 2015.

Tokusegawa Masano (德瀬川 正直, born August 6, 1983 as Badamsambuu Ganbold) is a former sumo wrestler from Ulan Bator, Mongolia. Joining the professional sport in 2003, he entered the top division for the first time in March 2010, and rose to the top of the maegashira ranks. He was forced to retire by the Japan Sumo Association in 2011 after being found guilty of match-fixing.

Career[edit]

Tokusegawa's debut tournament in maezumo was considered a rather ignominious one, as he was cautioned by judges for cursing in Mongolian at a fellow Mongolian wrestler and slapping the wrestler's chest just after losing to him. He soon went on to distinguish himself though, steadily rising through the ranks. Except for a period in early 2005 where he suffered three consecutive losing tournaments while struggling in the sandanme division, he never had two consecutive losing tournaments. He took the sandanme championship in the November 2006 tournament with a 7-0 perfect record. His sumo became even more consistent and after a slow but steady rise to the upper ranks of the makushita division, he took the championship in the May 2009 tournament. As a result, he became the first wrestler from his stable to be promoted to the elite sekitori ranks. It took him only four tournaments to make his way through the second jūryō division, in which he suffered only one losing tournament. He came through with winning records in his first three top makuuchi division tournaments before recording his first make-koshi at maegashira 4 in September 2010. He responded with scores of 8-7 in November (which included a win over ozeki Kotooshu) and 9-6 in January 2011.

After the January 2011 tournament Tokusegawa's Kiriyama stable shut down and he moved with his stablemaster to the affiliated Asahiyama stable.

Retirement from sumo[edit]

In April 2011 Tokusegawa was one of 23 wrestlers found guilty of match-fixing after an investigation by the Japan Sumo Association (JSA), and he was forced to retire from sumo. He responded, "I can't accept (this punishment). But what am I supposed to do if I oppose the JSA's decision?"[1] He would have reached a new highest rank of maegashira 1 in the May 2011 tournament.

Following his retirement Tokusegawa returned to his native country and participated in Mongolian wrestling, winning the Western Region Danshig Nadaam tournament in 2012.[2]

Fighting style[edit]

Tokusegawa was a yotsu-sumo specialist, preferring grappling techniques. His favoured grip on his opponent's mawashi was migi-yotsu (left hand outside, right hand inside) and his most common winning kimarite were yori-kiri and yori-taoshi (force out and down). He also regularly used uwatenage (overarm throw).

Career record[edit]

Tokusegawa Masanao[3]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2003 x x x (Maezumo) East Jonokuchi #38
6–1
 
West Jonidan #68
6–1
 
2004 West Sandanme #96
6–1
 
West Sandanme #36
6–1
 
West Makushita #51
3–4
 
West Sandanme #5
5–2
 
West Makushita #44
1–6
 
West Sandanme #11
4–3
 
2005 West Makushita #59
3–2–2
 
West Sandanme #12
2–5
 
East Sandanme #37
3–4
 
West Sandanme #51
3–4
 
West Sandanme #71
6–1
 
East Sandanme #15
3–4
 
2006 East Sandanme #30
4–3
 
West Sandanme #15
Sat out due to injury
0–0–7
East Sandanme #76
4–3
 
West Sandanme #56
4–3
 
East Sandanme #38
5–2
 
East Sandanme #13
7–0
Champion

 
2007 West Makushita #13
4–3
 
West Makushita #11
3–4
 
East Makushita #17
4–3
 
West Makushita #12
5–2
 
West Makushita #6
3–4
 
East Makushita #11
4–3
 
2008 West Makushita #7
2–5
 
West Makushita #18
5–2
 
East Makushita #10
4–3
 
West Makushita #7
4–3
 
East Makushita #5
3–4
 
East Makushita #7
5–2
 
2009 West Makushita #3
3–4
 
West Makushita #6
5–2
 
West Makushita #2
7–0
Champion

 
West Jūryō #9
8–7
 
East Jūryō #6
6–9
 
West Jūryō #8
10–5–P
 
2010 East Jūryō #1
9–6
 
West Maegashira #13
8–7
 
West Maegashira #11
9–6
 
West Maegashira #7
8–7
 
East Maegashira #4
6–9
 
West Maegashira #6
8–7
 
2011 West Maegashira #4
9–6
 
West Maegashira #1
Tournament Cancelled
0–0–0
West Maegashira #1
Retired
0–0–15
x x x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "SUMO/ Angry sumo wrestlers threaten to sue over lifetime ban". Asahi Shinbun. 5 April 2011. Retrieved 5 April 2011. 
  2. ^ "Former sumo wrestler, Tokusegawa B. Ganbold wins the Western Region Danshig Nadaam of Mongolia". InfoMongolia.com. 12 July 2012. Retrieved 30 January 2015. 
  3. ^ "Tokusegawa Masanao Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 24 May 2013. 

External links[edit]