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The Red Paintings

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The Red Paintings
Also known asTRP
OriginGeelong, Victoria, Australia
Genres
Labels
  • Independent
  • Modern Music/Sony BMG
  • Robot/Vitamin Records
Past members
  • Trash McSweeney
  • Josh Engelking
  • Wayne Jennings
  • Ellen Stancombe
  • Amanda Holmes
  • Andy Davis
  • David Sue Yek
Websitetheredpaintings.com

The Red Paintings (also shortened to TRP) are a collaborative art rock band originally formed in Geelong, Australia. Founding mainstay, Trash McSweeney provides lead vocals, guitar, sequencing and sampling. He has been joined by various musicians throughout the years.

The band is known for their themed performances incorporating elements of theatre and art, often self-described as "orchestral sci-fi art rock". Band members often dress in elaborate costumes and employ stage props, theatrical elements, and visual projections to support their shows. The band often invites members of the audience to paint during their live music set.

History

Formation and early releases

The Red Paintings were formed in Geelong by 1999 with front man Trash McSweeney (previously known as Jamie Barrett) on lead vocals, guitar, sequencing and sampling.[1][2] According to McSweeney, in 2006, Hitler was a "personal catalyst" and his band were a "bowl of Fruit Loops."[3] He also alleged that he was abducted by aliens, when younger.[3] The Sydney Morning Herald's Paris Pompor described his claims as "fanciful ideas".[3] McSweeney said he formed the band after having a seizure and seeing music as colour (synesthesia) when he woke up in the hospital.[4]

The band's original line-up issued two extended plays Angel Flummox (1999) and Reality (Ahead of Schedule) (2000).[5] Their third EP, Cinema Love, appeared via Asphalt Records in January 2002.[6] The group were briefly based in Melbourne before relocating to Brisbane in mid-2003.[7][8] Barrett explained why he left Melbourne, "A lot of people want to have a standard format band – get up there, play rock'n'roll, look good, have chicks fall over them, take cocaine..." but "For me, it was never about that."[9] From October to December 2003 the group undertook their Just People and Leaves tour of Australia.[10] McSweeney had received positive feedback and show offers at an impromptu solo gig in Brisbane.

The group, with McSweeney joined by Jasmine Ebeling on bass guitar, Leigh Doolan on drums and Ellen Stancombe on violin, tin whistle and vocals, recorded "I'll Sell You Suicide", which was entered for Triple J's Unearthed competition to represent Brisbane in 2004.[1] In 1999 Stancombe had been a member of a Celtic folk duo, Fineen, with David Peachey on drums, guitar and vocals.[11] The Red Paintings performed at 2004's Valley Fiesta.[1][7] The Red Paintings new line-up consisted of McSweeney and Stancombe joined by Josh Engelking on percussion and Wayne Jennings on cello.

Walls, Destroy the Robots and Feed the Wolf (2005–2007)

In April 2005, The Red Paintings were signed to Brisbane-based label, Modern Music with distribution by Sony BMG.[12] Title track "Walls" of the seven-track Walls EP (Modern Music/Sony BMG) entered the stations Net 50 chart at No. 3 and charted for fifteen weeks.[12][7] In 2005 the band conducted two national tours. For their early 2005 tour of China and Hong Kong they dropped the use of geisha and china doll costumes, Jennings explained, "we were afraid it might be regarded as culturally insensitive."[13]

The next release from the band in May 2006, Destroy the Robots, is the first installment of their Robot Trilogy. The EP reached the ARIA singles chart top 100 – their first charting release.[14] According to Dom Alessio of Who the Bloody Hell Are They? the EP is "a disappointing effort – I felt the band were attempting to craft a more mainstream sound and it didn’t work at all."[15] After a period with no regular percussionist, drummer Andy Davis was hired. The band toured Australia's capital cities and regional centres promoting the EP.[citation needed]

Recognition and radio airplay from this tour saw them picked as support for Mogwai, and play at The Great Escape. They also supported The Dresden Dolls on their 2006 Australian tour.[16][17][18] The tour was a success for the band,[19] and they were invited to continue as support for the Dresden Doll's subsequent tours in New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States.[citation needed] By October 2006 the band had left Modern Music/Sony BMG.[15] Their track, "It Is as It Was" (written by Barrett), was used on "Cold Blooded Creatures", episode of TV drama series, Love My Way, in February 2007.[20]

The Red Paintings released the third instalment in the Robot Trilogy, Feed the Wolf EP (June 2007).[21] It was recorded by the line-up of McSweeney on vocals, guitar, sequencing and samples; Stancombe on violin, tin whistle and vocals; Jennings on cello and vocals; Holmes on bass guitar; and Davis on drums.[22] This seven-track EP was funded via fan donations.[23] During June–July 2007 the band undertook their Animal Rebellion Tour to promote the EP.[24]

The Revolution Is Never Coming-present

According to the band's then-label, Asphalt Records, in 2003 they were "currently working on their new 14 track album", The Revolution Is Never Coming.[6] In June 2007, the band requested fan donations after announcing plans for recording the debut album. A$40,000 was successfully raised towards their independent LP.[25][26] They issued a single from the album, "We Belong in the Sea" (March 2008).[25]

By 2009 the Red Paintings had moved to Los Angeles.[27] They were announced as the support act for Mindless Self Indulgence on their US theatre tour during April and May 2009.[28] Red Paintings undertook their Chinese Whispers Tour of Australia in 2012.[27] Following these shows, Mindless Self Indulgence invited the Red Paintings to tour as the main support for their theatre tour across the UK and Europe in November and December 2013. Soon afterwards, ...And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead announced TRP as the opener for their North American tour in July 2013.[citation needed] The band also revealed its plans to release and tour their debut studio album with a new stage show beginning in Australia in June.

In 2013, the band released their 13-track debut studio album, The Revolution Is Never Coming, which has been described as "futuristic rock."[29][30] At the 2013 Queensland Music Awards, they entered "You're not One of Them" (written by Barrett) for the Video category.[31] In the 2010s Stancombe became a member of Desert Blues Cartel, a Brisbane-based blues, roots and rock group.[32] The Red Paintings relocated to the United Kingdom in 2014, returning to Geelong to support Gary Numan, in June of that year.[33] The Red Paintings became an international band, based across London and Los Angeles.[30]

Members

  • Trash McSweeney – lead vocals, guitar, sequencing, sampling
  • Josh Engelking – percussion
  • Wayne Jennings – cello
  • Ellen Stancombe – violin
  • Amanda Holmes – bass guitar[22]
  • Andy Davis – drums[22]
  • David Sue Yek – cello[34]
  • Leigh Doolan – drums[1]
  • Jasmine Ebeling – bass guitar[1]
  • Emma Baker – bass guitar[33]
  • Alix Kol – violin[33]

Discography

Albums

  • The Virgin Mary Australian Tour Acoustic/Strings Album or Your Tears Are Warning Signs (live album, 2004) – Asphalt Records (1903838678)[2][35]
  • Seizure & Synesthesia (video album, 2006) – Independent/Vitamin Records[17]
  • The Revolution Is Never Coming (2013)[36][37]

Extended plays

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Triple J Unearthed 2004 | Queensland | The Red Paintings". Triple J Unearthed. 2004. Archived from the original on 15 September 2004. Retrieved 13 April 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  2. ^ a b Bledsoe, Elliot (10 August 2004). "musicwire > cd-reviews > The Truth Is Out There: The Red Paintings by Elliott Bledsoe". vibewire.net. Archived from the original on 23 February 2008. Retrieved 7 June 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ a b c Paris, Pompor (30 May 2006). "The Red Paintings". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 7 May 2022. Retrieved 31 May 2022.
  4. ^ Jensen, Erik (28 June 2007). "The Red Paintings". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 3 May 2022.
  5. ^ a b c Stipack, Paul (2009). "The Red Paintings". Oz Links. Archived from the original on 4 October 2009. Retrieved 21 June 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ a b c "Releases :: Cinema Love". Australian Music Online. Archived from the original on 22 June 2005. Retrieved 14 March 2022.
  7. ^ a b c d "Established Artists – The Red Paintings Bio". Soulshine.com.au. 2006. Archived from the original on 20 August 2006. Retrieved 13 March 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "Releases :: Walls". Australian Music Online. Archived from the original on 27 November 2007. Retrieved 13 July 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ Coppack, Nick (2003). "Interviews :: The Red Paintings". Time Off. Archived from the original on 1 November 2003. Retrieved 20 July 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  10. ^ Stancombe, Ellen (2003). "WVTours". Wicked Violin Official Website. Archived from the original on 29 August 2007. Retrieved 13 July 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ "Fineen – Traditional Irish Shenanigans". David Peachey. Archived from the original on 16 June 2004. Retrieved 20 July 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ a b Eliezer, Christie (19 April 2005). "New Signings #5; Modern Music Hang the Red Paintings". In Music & Media (451). Archived from the original on 21 February 2006. Retrieved 13 March 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  13. ^ Curley, Adam (May 2005). "Brisbane – Reviews and interviews – The Red Paintings". Time Off. Our Brisbane. Archived from the original on 22 June 2005. Retrieved 20 July 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  14. ^ a b Wallace, Ian (15 May 2006). "Week Commencing ~ 15th May 2006 ~ Issue #845" (PDF). The ARIA Report. Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) (845): 2, 4, 7, 18. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 May 2006. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  15. ^ a b Alessio, Dom (12 October 2006). "The Red Paintings". Who the Bloody Hell Are They?. Archived from the original on 9 July 2008. Retrieved 13 July 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  16. ^ Le Montre, Darrah (June 2009). "Whale Wars' Sea Shepherd Nets Anthony Kiedis and Rick Rubin's Support". "Hollywood Today". Archived from the original on 17 June 2009. Retrieved 28 June 2013.
  17. ^ a b Clare (August 2007). "DVD: Seizure & Synesthesia – Red Paintings, The". TheDwarf.com.au. Archived from the original on 13 September 2007. Retrieved 14 March 2022.
  18. ^ Gunn, Nick (16 September 2006). "Concert Review: The Dresden Dolls + The Red Paintings". PopMatters. Archived from the original on 26 July 2007. Retrieved 14 March 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  19. ^ Browne, Sally (September 2004). "Trash Talking". The Courier-Mail. Archived from the original on 5 August 2009. Retrieved 29 June 2009.
  20. ^ Zuk, Tony. "Australian Television: Love My Way: Music Credits". Australian Television Information Archive. Archived from the original on 9 November 2010. Retrieved 13 July 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  21. ^ "The Red Paintings". Obscure Sound. July 2007. Retrieved 29 June 2009.
  22. ^ a b c Red paintings (Musical group) (2008), Feed the Wolf, Robot Records: Vitamin Records [distributor], retrieved 10 March 2022
  23. ^ Iain (23 July 2007). "Feed the Wolf – Red Paintings, The". thedwarf.com.au. Archived from the original on 14 September 2007. Retrieved 10 March 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  24. ^ Tope, Belle (29 May 2007). "The Red Paintings announce 'Animal Rebellion' Tour". TheDwarf.com.au. Archived from the original on 13 September 2007. Retrieved 14 March 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  25. ^ a b Wylie, Caird (27 March 2008). "The Red Paintings" (PDF). Forte Magazine (424): 2, 5, 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 July 2008. Retrieved 21 July 2022.
  26. ^ Watt, Dan (9 April 2008). "The Red Paintings". Beat Magazine. No. 1110. Archived from the original on 5 August 2009. Retrieved 14 March 2022.
  27. ^ a b Savellis, Cass (11 September 2012). "The Red Paintings". Tone Deaf. Archived from the original on 29 June 2022. Retrieved 13 July 2022.
  28. ^ "Bands". Billboard the Venue. 8 April 2009. Archived from the original on 13 September 2009. Retrieved 13 July 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  29. ^ Keating, Justine (5 June 2013). "The Red Paintings / The Revolution Is Never Coming". themusic.com.au. Retrieved 3 May 2022.
  30. ^ a b "Internationally-acclaimed art rockers The Red Paintings head to Cumbria". Times and Star. 7 June 2017. Retrieved 4 May 2022.
  31. ^ "Qld Music Awards 2013". Queensland Music Awards. Archived from the original on 14 October 2013. Retrieved 13 July 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  32. ^ "Desert Blues Cartel". Triple J Unearthed. Retrieved 20 July 2022.
  33. ^ a b c McRae, Rhys (4 June 2014). "Why Gary Numan Is the Godfather of the 90s". Tone Deaf. Archived from the original on 23 July 2018. Retrieved 21 June 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  34. ^ "Wakers and Shakers: The Red Paintings Continued..." Attitude Pulse. Archived from the original on 7 September 2007. Retrieved 14 March 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  35. ^ "Your Tears Are Warning Signs – Red Paintings | Release Info". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 8 December 2021. Retrieved 15 July 2022.
  36. ^ Potts, Gilbert (23 May 2013). "The Revolution Is Never Coming". Tone Deaf. Archived from the original on 28 October 2020. Retrieved 14 March 2022.
  37. ^ G. M. M. (8 January 2014). "The Red Paintings: The Revolution Is Never Coming". loudersound. Retrieved 4 May 2022.
  38. ^ Thomas, Tara (12 July 2004). "Week Commencing ~ 12th July 2004 ~ Issue #750" (PDF). The ARIA Report. Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) (750): 25. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 August 2004. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  39. ^ Thomas, Tara (23 May 2005). "Week Commencing ~ 23rd May 2005 ~ Issue #750" (PDF). The ARIA Report. Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) (795): 34. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 June 2005. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  40. ^ Eliezer, Christie (8 May 2007). "Vitamin Distributes Red Painting Catalogue". In Music & Media. Archived from the original on 17 February 2008. Retrieved 13 March 2022 – via National Library of Australia.

External links