Trichoglossum

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Trichoglossum
Trichoglossum hirsutum.alan.jpg
Trichoglossum hirsutum
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Fungi
Division: Ascomycota
Class: Geoglossomycetes
Order: Geoglossales
Family: Geoglossaceae
Genus: Trichoglossum
Boud. (1885)
Type species
Trichoglossum hirsutum
(Pers.) Boud. (1907)

Trichoglossum is a genus of fungi in the family Geoglossaceae. They are commonly called hairy earth tongues. The type species is Trichoglossum hirsutum.[1]

Members of the genus Trichoglossum have tiny hairs known as setae on the spore bearing surface. The related genus Geoglossum lacks hairs on the spore bearing surface.

History[edit]

The genus Trichoglossum was created by Émile Boudier,[2] who constructed the new genus to include species of Geoglossum bearing prominent setae. Numerous authors have examined this genus since its creation,[3][4][5] with many new species and varieties described. Index Fungorum currently lists 47 names, including forms and varieties, while Kirk et al. (2008)[6] acknowledge 19 species. Published molecular phylogenetic research also supports the genus as a well-supported clade.[7][8][9]

Location[edit]

Trichoglossum species are found in woodlands in North America and Europe, as well as Asia,[4] Australasia,[10] India,[11] and South America.[12][13]

Species[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Index Fungorum - Trichoglossum Genus". 
  2. ^ Boudier, É. (1885). "Nouvelle classification naturelle des Discomycetese charnus connus generalement sous le nom de Pezizales". Bulletin Societe Mycologique de France. 1: 91–120. 
  3. ^ Durand, E.J. (1908). "The Geoglossaceae of North America". Annales Mycologici. 6: 387–477. OCLC 1481332. 
  4. ^ a b Imai, S. (1941). "Geoglossaceae Japoniae". Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture. Hokkaido Imperial University. 45: 155–264. 
  5. ^ Mains, E.B. (1954). "North American Species of Geoglossum and Trichoglossum". Mycologia. 46: 586–631. JSTOR 4547871. 
  6. ^ Kirk PM, Cannon PF, Minter DW, Stalpers JA (2008). Dictionary of the Fungi (10th ed.). Wallingford, UK: CAB International. ISBN 978-0-85199-826-8. 
  7. ^ Sandnes, A.C.S. (2006). Phylogenetic relationships among species and genera of Geoglossaceae (Helotiales) based on ITS and LSU nrDNA sequences (Masters). University of Oslo. 
  8. ^ Schoch CL, Wang Z, Townsend JP, Spatafora JW (2009). "Geoglossomycetes cl. nov., Geoglossales ord. nov. and taxa above class rank in the Ascomycota Tree of Life". Persoonia. 22: 129–38. doi:10.3767/003158509X461486. PMC 2776753Freely accessible. PMID 19915689. 
  9. ^ Hustad VP, Miller AN, Moingeon JM, Priou JP (2011). "Inclusion of Nothomitra in Geoglossomycetes" (PDF). Mycosphere. 2: 646–654. doi:10.5943/mycosphere/2/6/5. 
  10. ^ Spooner BM (1987). "Helotiales of Australasia: Geoglossaceae, Orbiliaceae, Sclerotiniaceae, Hyaloscyphaceae". Bibliotheca Mycologica. 116: 1–711. ISSN 0067-8066.  Maas Geesteranus RA (1965). "Geoglossaceae of India and Adjacent Countries". Persoonia. 4 (1): 19–46. ISSN 0031-5850. oai:ARNO:532470. 
  11. ^ Maas Geesteranus, RA (1965). "Geoglossaceae of India and Adjacent Countries". Persoonia. 4 (1): 19–46. 
  12. ^ Gamundi I (1979). "Subantarctic Geoglossaceae II". Sydowia. 32: 86–98. ISSN 0082-0598. 
  13. ^ Hladki AI, Romero AI (2009). "La familia Geoglossaceae s. str. (Helotiales) en la provincia de Tucumán (Argentina)". Boletín de la Sociedad Argentina de Botánica. 44 (3–4): 249–255. ISSN 1851-2372. 

External links[edit]