USS P. K. Bauman (SP-377)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from USS P. K. Bauman)
Jump to: navigation, search
History
United States
Name: USS P. K. Bauman
Namesake: Former owner's name retained upon commissioning
Builder: M. M. Davis and Sons, Solomons, Maryland
Completed: 1912
Acquired: 28 May 1917
Commissioned: 10 August 1917
Fate: Struck rock and foundered 12 January 1919
General characteristics
Type: Patrol vessel
Tonnage: 304 tons gross
Length: 158 ft 0 in (48.16 m)
Beam: 24 ft 0 in (7.32 m)
Draft: 8 ft 8 in (2.64 m) mean
Speed: 12 knots
Armament:

USS P. K. Bauman (SP-377) was a patrol vessel that served in the United States Navy from 1917 to 1919.

P. K. Bauman was built in 1912 by M. M. Davis and Sons, Solomons, Maryland, as a freighter. She was acquired by the United States Navy under charter from M. M. Davis and Sons on 28 May 1917 for service in World War I, designated SP-377, and commissioned at Norfolk, Virginia, on 10 August 1917 with Lieutenant Charles F. Chambers, USNRF, in command.

P. K. Bauman was assigned to Squadron 4, Atlantic Patrol Force, for overseas escort duty. The squadron, commanded by Captain Thomas P. Magruder aboard his flagship, the armed yacht Wakiva II, departed Boston, Massachusetts, on 25 August 1917 for Provincetown, Massachusetts, then departed Provincetown on 26 August 1917 en route Brest, France. The squadron called at Ponta Delgada in the Azores from 6 September 1917 to 11 September 1917, Wakiva II having had to tow P. K. Bauman part of the way due to a breakdown in P. K. Bauman's propulsion system. The squadron arrived at Brest on 18 September 1917.

P. K. Bauman performed patrol and convoying duties for the remainder of World War I. Two months after the war ended, while patrolling off L’Orient, France, she struck a rock on 12 January 1919. Listing badly, she was taken in tow by minesweeper Raymond J. Anderton, but eventually sank.

References[edit]

External links[edit]