Urs Fischer

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Urs Fischer
Born 1973 (age 43–44)
Switzerland
Nationality Swiss
Education Schule fur Gestaltung, Zurich
Known for photography, contemporary art
Website www.ursfischer.com

Urs Fischer (born 1973) is a Swiss-born artist living in New York City.

Education and early career[edit]

Born to two doctors as the second of two children in 1973,[1] Fischer began his career in Switzerland where he studied photography at the Schule für Gestaltung, Zurich.[2] After the basic, first-year course in art and design, he enrolled in the school's photography department, and supported himself by working as a bouncer at Zurich night clubs and house parties.[3]

Fischer moved to Amsterdam in 1993, at the age of nineteen, and had his first solo show at a gallery in Zurich in 1996. He later lived in London, Los Angeles, and Berlin before moving to New York.[4] In Berlin and New York, he shared studios with fellow artist Rudolf Stingel.[5]

Work[edit]

Untitled (Lamp/Bear) was installed at the Brown University campus in June 2016.

Fischer's subversive approach to art is often considered to be influenced by anti-art movements like Neo-Dada, Lost Art, or the Situationist International.[6] Since Fischer began showing his work, in the mid-nineteen-nineties, in Europe, he has produced an enormous number of objects, drawings, collages, and room-size installations.[7]

Individual pieces[edit]

In Untitled (Bread House) (2004-2005), Fischer constructed a Swiss style chalet out of loaves of bread. His Bad Timing, Lamb Chop! (2004-2005), displays a giant wooden chair (actually cast aluminum) intersecting a half empty packet of cigarettes dramatically increased in scale.

Between 2005 and 2006, he created Untitled (Lamp/Bear), an edition of three 23-foot-tall, 20-ton, bronze bears (two are yellow, the third is blue) intersected with generic functional lamps that appear to spring out of their heads;[8] in 2011, one of the pieces was displayed for five months at Seagram Building's plaza before being auctioned at Christie's.[9] The blue version was installed at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island in June 2016.[10][11]

In his series Problem Paintings, the artist juxtaposes headshots of old Hollywood movie stars, with silkscreened pictures of either fruit or hardware.[12]

For his 2007 show at Gavin Brown's Enterprise in New York, Fischer excavated the gallery's main room, bringing in contractors to dig an eight-foot hole where the floor had been, and calling the result You.[13] In Death of a Moment (2007), two entire walls are equipped with floor-to-ceiling mirrors and set in motion by a hydraulic system, to create the surreal effect of a room in flux, morphing in shape and size.[14]

In 2016, Fischer created an eight fool tall wax sculpture of artist and director Julian Schnabel. The piece was also a candle and the wax slowly melted when burned.[15]

Publication[edit]

Fischer has his own publishing imprint, Kiito-San, whose books are distributed by DAP[16] and Buchhandlung Walther König. The imprint has published exhibition catalogues by Fischer as well as books on the work of Spencer Sweeney, Peter Regli, and Darren Bader. In 2015 Kiito-San released a cookbook called Cooking for Artists, written by Mina Stone, who cooks lunch at Fischer's studio.

Fischer's current studio occupies a large warehouse in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn, near the waterfront.[17]

Exhibitions[edit]

Fischer's installations and sculptures have been exhibited in some group exhibitions and biennales worldwide, including Manifesta 3[18] and the Venice Biennale in 2003, 2007, and 2011.[19] His solo exhibition at the Kunsthaus Zürich in 2004, titled "Kir Royal," was his first large-scale solo museum exhibition.[20] Recent major exhibitions include "Not My House Not My Fire," Espace 315, Centre Pompidou, Paris (2004); "Mary Poppins," Blaffer Gallery, Art Museum of the University of Houston, Houston, Texas (2006); "Urs Fischer: Marguerite de Ponty," New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (2009–10);[21] "Skinny Sunrise", Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna (2012);[22] "Madame Fisscher," Palazzo Grassi, Venice (2012); "Urs Fischer," Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2013); and "YES," Deste Foundation Project Space, Hydra, Greece (2013).[23] "Urs Fischer: the Public & the Private", Legion of Honor[24]

Art market[edit]

Fischer has been working with Sadie Coles HQ, in London, and Gavin Brown's Enterprise, in New York, since 2003.[25] Fischer has also worked with Gagosian Gallery since 2012.[26]

Personal life[edit]

Fischer was married to Tara Subkoff.[27] He has a daughter with the artist Cassandra MacLeod.[28]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Calvin Tomkins (October 19, 2009), The Imperfectionist - Urs Fischer's inspired sloppiness The New Yorker.
  2. ^ Urs Fischer, Untitled (Lamp/Bear) (2005-2006) Christie's, New York.
  3. ^ Calvin Tomkins (October 19, 2009), The Imperfectionist - Urs Fischer's inspired sloppiness The New Yorker.
  4. ^ Calvin Tomkins (October 19, 2009), The Imperfectionist - Urs Fischer's inspired sloppiness The New Yorker.
  5. ^ Calvin Tomkins (October 19, 2009), The Imperfectionist - Urs Fischer's inspired sloppiness The New Yorker.
  6. ^ Urs Fischer: Skinny Sunrise. Exhibition catalog. Kunsthalle Wien 2002.
  7. ^ Calvin Tomkins (October 19, 2009), The Imperfectionist - Urs Fischer's inspired sloppiness The New Yorker.
  8. ^ Urs Fischer, Untitled (Lamp/Bear) (2005-2006) Christie's, New York.
  9. ^ Sarah Douglas Christie's Bullish on Urs Fischer's Bear New York Observer.
  10. ^ https://news.brown.edu/articles/2016/06/public-art
  11. ^ https://www.brown.edu/about/public-art/Fischer
  12. ^ Alexia Antsakli Vardinoyanni. Urs Fischer Interview: Natural Order. artflyernet. Accessed 25 January 2017.
  13. ^ Calvin Tomkins (October 19, 2009), The Imperfectionist - Urs Fischer's inspired sloppiness The New Yorker.
  14. ^ Urs Fischer: 'Douglas Sirk', Sadie Coles HQ, London, 06/10—11/12/2010 The Modern Institute, Glasgow.
  15. ^ Jerry Saltz (May 17, 2016). "This 8-Foot Candle Portrait Mesmerized Me". Vulture. Retrieved May 17, 2016. 
  16. ^ http://www.artbook.com/kiito-san.html
  17. ^ Calvin Tomkins (October 19, 2009), The Imperfectionist - Urs Fischer's inspired sloppiness The New Yorker.
  18. ^ "Urs Fischer Biography". Sadie Coles HQ. Retrieved 2008-04-17. 
  19. ^ "jet set lady - a project by urs fischer". Designboom. Retrieved 2008-04-17.  External link in |publisher= (help)
  20. ^ URS FISCHER: Agnes Martin, December 15, 2007 – January 20, 2008 Regen Projects, Los Angeles.
  21. ^ Massara, Kathleen (December 2009). "Urs Fischer: Marguerite de Ponty". The Brooklyn Rail. 
  22. ^ Urs Fischer: schmutz schmutz, April 5 - May 26, 2012 Gagosian Gallery, Paris.
  23. ^ Urs Fischer: mermaid / pig / bro w/ hat, April 3 - May 23, 2014 Gagosian Gallery, New York.
  24. ^ https://legionofhonor.famsf.org/exhibitions/urs-fischer
  25. ^ Calvin Tomkins (October 19, 2009), The Imperfectionist - Urs Fischer's inspired sloppiness The New Yorker.
  26. ^ "Urs Fischer - February 23 - April 7, 2012 - Gagosian Gallery". www.gagosian.com. Retrieved 2016-03-16. 
  27. ^ Carl Swanson (November 16, 2015), Can Art School's Cool Kids Grow Up to Be Anti-Bullying Activists? New York Magazine.
  28. ^ Lynn Hirschberg (November 19, 2015), The Art of Being Tara Subkoff W.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Adam McEwen, Urs Fischer: Beds and Problem Paintings (New York: Rizzoli), 2012
  • Caroline Bourgeois, Patricia Falguières, Michele Robecchi, Urs Fischer: Madame Fisscher (New York: Kiito-San), 2012
  • Bice Curiger, Massimiliano Gioni, Jessica Morgan, Urs Fischer: Shovel in a Hole (Zurich: JRP Ringier), 2009
  • Garrick Jones, Brice Marden, Beatrix Ruf, Urs Fischer: Good Small Make-Up Tree (Zurich: JRP Ringier), 2005
  • Bruce Hainley, Jörg Heiser, Mirjam Varadinis, Urs Fischer: Kir Royal (Zurich: JRP Ringier), 2005