User:Kurtsayin/Shaolin Kempo Karate

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Shaolin Kempo Karate
Also known as SKK, Villari's SKK
Focus Striking, Kicking, Felling & Grappling
Hardness Full Contact
Country of origin United States USA
Creator Fredrick J. Villari
Parenthood Shaolin Kung Fu/Chinese Martial Arts, Nick Cerio's Kempo, Chin Na/Jujutsu
Olympic sport No

Shaolin Kempo Karate (or "SKK") is a martial art style that aims to combine the Five Animals of Shaolin Kung Fu, the core competency of American Kenpo, the hard-hitting linear explosiveness of karate, as well as the grappling arts of Jujutsu and Chin Na.[1] This system was founded and developed by Grandmaster Fredrick J. Villari, Massachusetts martial arts mogul, and former black belt student of East Coast Kenpo legend Master Nick Cerio.[2][3]

Fred Villari, through years of training in traditional Asian martial arts and western boxing, devised a hybrid system which would seamlessly integrate the "4 ways of fighting" and thusly eliminate the inherent weakness of martial arts systems that focus more heavily on just one or two of these four ways of fighting: Striking, Kicking, Felling, and Grappling.[4]

Shaolin Kempo Karate is primarily taught through a nation wide chain of Villari's Martial Arts Centers, although there are several offshoot organizations that teach Shaolin Kempo Karate without direct affiliation of Fred Villari.

History & Development[edit]

The roots of Shaolin Kempo Karate (or: "SKK") can be traced back to 3 main sources of Asian Martial arts:

1. The Shaolin Temple - where "Kung Fu" and other Chinese martial arts are commonly referred to as "temple boxing"[5][6] unless a specific animal form or style is specified.

2. The Yoshida and Komatsu clans of Japan who founded the system of "Kenpo."[7]

3. Mongolian monastery wrestling from which most Asian grappling arts (such as Chin Na and Jujutsu) descended.[8]

Through the spread of the art of Kenpo in Hawaii and later into the continental United States, Kenpo, and later Kenpo Karate was systematized by Ed Parker who brought the art to mainstream America.[9] Through later work of Professor Nick Cerio, Kenpo was brought to the East Coast of the United States,[10] where Professor Cerio would meet and ultimately train a young Fredrick J. Villari - founder and Grandmaster of Shaolin Kempo Karate.

"Villari’s martial arts training started early in his life. After being introduced to Western and Chinese boxing by his father, Villari went on to study jiujitsu and wrestling with the LeBlanc brothers in his middle teens. By the time he was 18, Villari realized his martial arts training was stagnating and sought out Nick Cerio as an instructor of Chinese kenpo. After completing his requirements as second degree black belt with Cerio, Villari traveled to the West Indies where he traded his techniques for karate and kung-fu training. While in the islands, Villari also studied under a Chinese-Australian instructor Soo, and gained his third and fourth degrees. After working with another master Len Chou, Villari received his fifth degree and soon decided to open his own school."[11]

The original Shaolin Kempo Karate school was United Studios of Self Defense,[12] later becoming Fred Villari’s Studio of Self Defense. It was under this name that the SKK style spread across the northeastern United States. Shaolin Kempo Karate is now taught around much of the Northern United States. The development of the system consisted mainly of mastering several existing martial arts, respectfully removing inefficient movements, and then integrating the remainder effective movements seamlessly into the SKK system.[13] Fred Villari borrowed heavily from the following in the development of SKK:

1. Shaolin Kung Fu (the "backbone"[14] of SKK) for its devestating punches and kicks as well as incorporation of the 5 animals: Tiger, Crane, Dragon, Snake and Leopard, and an overall sense of balance and lifestyle of health and fitness. Villari has an affinity for the Shaolin "Immortal Monkey" which is rooted in Southern Shaolin movements, but changed significantly to fit more closely the size, strength and reach of a larger person.

2. Karate for its mechanical style as well as linear and angular movements combined with quick shuffles and explosive attacks.

3. Nick Cerio's Kempo for its mixture of both hard and soft movements that blend nicely in combinations as well as its concepts of Swift Tigers, Honsuki, and more.[15]

4. Chin Na for its focus on holding, seizing, locking, throwing, felling and delivering pain that can be controlled.

For his contributions to the martial arts world and the spread of Shaolin Kempo Karate to thousands of Americans, Frederick J. Villari's induction as the "Grandmaster of the 20th Century" into the World Masters and Black Belt Federation is noted in the year 2005.[16]

Four Ways of Fighting[edit]

Shaolin Kempo Karate is built on the notion that all martial arts styles can be characterised as using one or more of the "four ways of fighting"[17]

  1. Striking - to use of any part of the arms (e.g. open or closed hand, elbows, or forearms)
  2. Kicking - to use of any part of the leg (e.g. foot, shin, or knee)
  3. Felling - to knock an opponent off his feet (e.g. by throwing, pulling, or shoving)
  4. Grappling - to clutch or grip (e.g. wrestling, holding, or locking joints).

Belts[edit]

Shaolin Kempo Karate has eleven belt ranks (excluding dan ranks). New students begin at white belt and progress throughout time. Ranks are represented both by a color (the color of the belt worn) and a japanese title.

The grading in Shaolin Kempo Karate consists of mainly patterns, techniques and theory. In addition, students are placed in various situations that will help them develop a stronger and more logical mind. Patterns consist of a display of kicks and punches as well as displacements. Theory is displayed verbally and expresses information on the art of Five Animal Kung Fu.

Rank (Kyu) Belt Color Japanese Rank
11th White -6th Rokkyu
10th Yellow -5th Rokkyu
9th Orange -4th Rokkyu
8th Purple -3rd Rokkyu
7th Blue -2nd Rokkyu
6th Blue Stripe Green -1st Rokkyu
5th Green ごっきゅ-Gokkyu
4th Green Stripe Brown -Yonkyu
3rd Brown 3rd Kyu -Sankyu
2nd Brown 2nd Kyu -Nikkyu
1st Brown 1st Kyu -Ikkyu
-- Black 1st Dan しょだん-Shodan

Controversies[edit]

Being that the Villari's organization grew so large so quickly, and that Fred Villari claimed he had functionally created an unbeatable fighting system, many martial arts authorities were quick with criticisms and accusations.[18] Most typically, this came from practitioners of the highly traditional forms of Kung Fu and Karate who claimed that Villari did not have the authorization to innovate and change traditional (and in many cases "sacred") animal forms, Chi Kung and so much more. Furthermore, there was debate on wether Villari was teaching "Chin Na" at all, since he claimed it was Mongolian and Tibetan while historically it is recognized to Chinese in origin. Most egregious of all accusations and controversies is over Villari's decision to award himself a 10th degree black belt. Although Villari did indeed invent many combinations which had not existed before SKK, unveiled many styles which were virtually unknown in the USA, and was ranked through 2nd degree by Nick Cerio[19] 3rd and 4th degree by Master "Soo"[20]and his 5th degree by Len Chou.[21]members of the traditional martial arts communities felt that Villari lacked the authorization necessary to be considered a Grandmaster.

"Not surprisingly, a great deal of controversy has been stirred up by Villari and his schools. Shortly before press time, Villari announced, much to the consternation of the New England martial arts community, that he had promoted himself to tenth degree black belt-'…the tenth dan style of my own creation... which draws from all my martial arts training and includes speed movements I have developed myself. I teach this system to only a handful of my top black belts…,' he emphasized."[22]

However, criticisms often stop upon the acceptance of a demonstration request. From the same article:

"Watching him in the dojo, one sees his 5'9" 175 pound muscular body move with a gymnast's swiftness. The 30-year-old's spinning back kicks are particularly fast and his timing with the Chinese hand techniques is flawless. Seeing him spar, one recognizes a sense of movement, a feel for the opponent, that comes only to the most disciplined martial artist... Few of his most ardent critics question his personal skill in the arts."[23]

One other point of contention on the Villari organization is the DVD set with which one can receive certified belts via video up to black belt without ever being seen in person by an instructor.[24] This is, however, more of a criticism not of Fred Villari's martial arts prowess or of the system of Shaolin Kempo Karate, but more so a criticism of the Villari organization's business practices.

See also[edit]


Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Villari, Fred. "Hidden Beneath the Shadows - Balance Your Mind and Body for the Millennium" Sumerel Enterprises; 2nd edition (March 1998)
  2. ^ Ayoob, Massad. "Fred Villari Markets the Martial Arts" Black Belt Magazine, July 1975.
  3. ^ http://www.villari.com/fvbio.htm
  4. ^ Villari, Fred. "Hidden Beneath the Shadows - Balance Your Mind and Body for the Millennium" Sumerel Enterprises; 2nd edition (March 1998)
  5. ^ Zhāng Kǒngzhāo 張孔昭 (c. 1784) (in Chinese). Boxing Classic: Essential Boxing Methods 拳經拳法備要 Quánjīng Quánfǎ Bèiyào
  6. ^ Henning, Stanley E. (Fall 1999). "Academia Encounters the Chinese Martial arts". China Review International 6 (2): 319–332. doi:10.1353/cri.1999.0020. ISSN 1069-5834
  7. ^ Rathbone, Jim. "James Mitose and the Path of Kenpo" 2006 White Tiger Productions. p.14-15
  8. ^ Villari, Fred. "Hidden Beneath the Shadows - Balance Your Mind and Body for the Millennium" Sumerel Enterprises; 2nd edition (March 1998)
  9. ^ http://kenpokarate.com/blackbelted_mormon.html
  10. ^ Cerio, Nick. "Nick Cerio's Kenpo - The Master's Text" Publisher: Nick Cerios Kenpo (July 1997). ISBN-10: 0966017803
  11. ^ Ayoob, Massad. "Fred Villari Markets the Martial Arts" Black Belt Magazine, July 1975.
  12. ^ Ayoob, Massad. "Fred Villari Markets the Martial Arts" Black Belt Magazine, July 1975.
  13. ^ Villari, Fred. "Hidden Beneath the Shadows - Balance Your Mind and Body for the Millennium" Sumerel Enterprises; 2nd edition (March 1998)
  14. ^ Villari, Fred. "Hidden Beneath the Shadows - Balance Your Mind and Body for the Millennium" Sumerel Enterprises; 2nd edition (March 1998)
  15. ^ Cerio, Nick. "Nick Cerio's Kenpo - The Master's Text" Publisher: Nick Cerios Kenpo (July 1997). ISBN-10: 0966017803
  16. ^ http://www.wmabbfed.com/page/page/2835409.htm
  17. ^ Villari, Fred. "Hidden Beneath the Shadows - Balance Your Mind and Body for the Millennium" Sumerel Enterprises; 2nd edition (March 1998)
  18. ^ Ayoob, Massad. "Fred Villari Markets the Martial Arts" Black Belt Magazine, July 1975.
  19. ^ Ayoob, Massad. "Fred Villari Markets the Martial Arts" Black Belt Magazine, July 1975.
  20. ^ Ayoob, Massad. "Fred Villari Markets the Martial Arts" Black Belt Magazine, July 1975.
  21. ^ Ayoob, Massad. "Fred Villari Markets the Martial Arts" Black Belt Magazine, July 1975.
  22. ^ Ayoob, Massad. "Fred Villari Markets the Martial Arts" Black Belt Magazine, July 1975.
  23. ^ Ayoob, Massad. "Fred Villari Markets the Martial Arts" Black Belt Magazine, July 1975.
  24. ^ http://www.villari.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=SKK&Product_Code=GVWTBBV&Category_Code=