User talk:Qsat495

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Hello lets get to work.

Jacquelyn Grant[edit]

To Do List: Research/ References/ Book Receptivity/ Biddy Mason small bio/

Jacquelyn Grant (December 19, 1948) is widely regarded as an important “womanist theologian”. Her book White Women's Christ and Black Women's Jesus: Feminist Christology and Womanist Response became a best seller. The text is described as laying out the complex relationship between Christology and feminism. Grant expands on the idea by interjecting women other than European descent and origin into this equation. Outlining these relationships, Grant intersects these concepts of Christology and womanist theology. The result of exploring the two concepts together helps to address the historical and modern day experiences for Black women’s plight.[1]


Grant’s work in White Women's Christ and Black Women's Jesus: Feminist Christology and Womanist Response, conveyed the "tri-dimensional reality render[ing] their situation a complex one. One could say that not only are they the oppressed of the oppressed, but their situation represents the "particular within the particular,"[2] as author `Joan M. Martin points out in The Notion of Difference for Emerging Women Ethics to address a broader subject on ethics in society. By exploring the relationship between Black women and Jesus as a “divine co-sufferer”[3], provides meaningful examples to expound on an assortment of topics dealing with Black women’s experiences.

Inspiring many, Grant’s work has opened the floor for meaningful discussions. She explains the existence of Black women suffering from the webbing of class, gender, and racial oppressions coming from people and society. From this illustration, shows the unique and complex reality in which Black women face. This relationship is much different from that of Black males as well as White women’s positions in the world; which intensifies the task of liberating even more.

Reference[edit]

  1. ^ Grant, J. (1989). White Women's Christ and Black Women's Jesus: Feminist Christology and Womanist Response. Atlanta, Ga.: Scholars Press.
  2. ^ Joan M. Martin, "The Notion of Difference for Emerging Women Ethics."
  3. ^ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Womanist_theology