Victor Haghani

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Victor Haghani (born c. 1962[1]) is an Iranian-American financier,[2] one of the founding partners of Long Term Capital Management (LTCM), a hedge fund which collapsed in 1998 and was eventually bailed out by a consortium of leading banks.[3] The son of an Iranian international trader of a Sephardic Jewish family,[2] Haghani graduated from the London School of Economics (LSE). He was a founding partner of LTCM and after the liquidation of LTCM became a founding partner of JWM Partners which managed a successor fund to LTCM.

Education[edit]

Victor Haghani graduated from the London School of Economics (LSE) in 1984, where he received a B.Sc. degree in finance. He has also taught at the LSE, where he is a Senior Research Associate in the FMG.

Career[edit]

Haghani started his career in 1984 in the bond research department of Salomon Brothers[4] and then became a managing director in the bond arbitrage group run by John Meriwether. During his time at Salomon Brothers, Haghani earned the nickname "The Viper" for his sharp tongue and propensity for high risk trades.[5] In 1993, he co-founded Long Term Capital Management with seven other partners. In 1993, he set up the LTCM office in London. Haghani stayed on at LTCM through 1999 to assist in the liquidation of LTCM, following which he became a founding partner of JWM Partners, which managed a successor fund to LTCM. Since then, he has been involved in a variety of activities, including consulting and board assignments, becoming a name at Lloyd's of London and learning how to fly an airplane. In 2011 he founded Elm Partners, an active index investment fund.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nakamura, Yuji (25 March 2015). "Quant Who Shook the Financial World Tries More Humble Approach". Bloomberg News. Bloomberg. Retrieved 31 March 2015. ... Haghani, 53, says... 
  2. ^ a b Origins
  3. ^ Profile
  4. ^ Lewis, Michael (1989). Liar's Poker: Rising through the Wreckage on Wall Street. New York: W.W. Norton. ISBN 0-393-02750-3. 
  5. ^ Lowenstein, Roger (2000). When Genius Failed: the Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management. Random House Trade Paperbacks. pp. 95–97. ISBN 978-0-375-75825-6. 
  6. ^ "Elm Partners Website". Retrieved July 2015. ... As I started to move my family's savings into this Active Index Investing approach a dozen close friends told me they wanted to go that way too. This gave birth to Elm Partners at the end of 2011...  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)