Vladimir Yazdovsky

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Vladimir Yazdovsky (1913–1999) was a Soviet space program medical scientist.

Yazdovsky was a veteran surgeon and army doctor who joined the Institute for Aviation and Medeicine in Moscow in 1948.[1]There, in the early 1950s, Yazdovsky assisted Sergei Korolev in tests using small animals in sub-orbital spaceflight.[2] His team of researchers helped gather strays from Moscow and helped design various safety measures such as space suits and life-support systems.[3]

In 1957 he prepared the dog Laika, the first animal to orbit, the Earth for Sputnik 2.[4] In 1960 Yazdovsky prepared the dogs Belka and Strelka for Korabl-Sputnik 2, the first spaceflight to launch animals into orbit and return them alive to Earth.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Amy Nelson, "Cold War Celebrity and the Courageous Canine Scout" in James T. Andrews and Asif A. Siddiqi Into the Cosmos: Space Exploration and Soviet Culture(Pittsburgh, PA: U of Pittsburgh 2011)p. 136
  2. ^ "A Brief History of Animals in Space". NASA. Retrieved 31 August 2013.
  3. ^ Amy Nelson, "Cold War Celebrity and the Courageous Canine Scout" in James T. Andrews and Asif A. Siddiqi Into the Cosmos: Space Exploration and Soviet Culture(Pittsburgh, PA: U of Pittsburgh 2011)p. 136
  4. ^ "50 years ago, a dog paved way for space travel". The Age. Fairfax Media. 6 November 2007. Retrieved 31 August 2013.
  5. ^ Isachenkov, Vladimir (20 August 2010). "Soviet Space dogs honored on 50th anniversary of flight". The Christian Science Monitor. Christian Science Publishing Society. Retrieved 31 August 2013.