Wallace Nesbitt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Not to be confused with Wally Nesbitt.
Wallace Nesbitt
K.C.
Wallace Nesbitt.jpg
Puisne Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada
In office
May 16, 1903 – October 4, 1905
Nominated by Wilfrid Laurier
Preceded by David Mills
Succeeded by James Maclennan
3rd President of the Canadian Bar Association
In office
1928–1929
Preceded by J.E. Martin
Succeeded by Richard B. Bennett
5th President of the Ontario Bar Association
In office
1923–1927
Preceded by George P. Henderson, K.C.
Succeeded by Newton W. Rowell, K.C.
Personal details
Born (1858-05-13)May 13, 1858
Woodstock, Canada West
Died April 7, 1930(1930-04-07) (aged 71)
Toronto, Ontario
Alma mater Osgoode Hall

Wallace Nesbitt, KC (May 13, 1858 – April 7, 1930) was a Canadian lawyer and puisne justice of the Supreme Court of Canada.

Born in Woodstock, Canada West (now Ontario), the son of John W. Nesbitt and Mary Wallace, he was called to the Ontario Bar in 1881. A practising lawyer, he was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada in 1903. He served for two years until he resigned in 1905.

Nesbitt served as the President of the Ontario Bar Association from 1923 to 1927,[1] and as national President of the Canadian Bar Association from 1928 to 1929.[2]

Family[edit]

Memorial Stained Glass Window, Douglass Burr Plumb, Memorial Stairwell, Mackenzie Building, Royal Military College of Canada

In 1887, Wallace Nesbitt married Louisa Andrée Plumb née Elliott (d. 1894), the widow of his one-time law partner Thomas Street Plumb (d. 1885), and became the stepfather of two young children. In memory of his stepson Gentleman Cadet Douglas Burr Plumb, who drowned at Romaine, Labrador on June 22, 1903, Wallace Nesbitt donated a stained glass memorial window in 1920 featuring a Royal Military College of Canada crest and motto.[3]

References[edit]

External links[edit]