Walter Devereux, 7th Baron Ferrers of Chartley

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Arms of Sir Walter Devereux, 7th Baron Ferrers of Chartley, KG
Walter Devereux, 7th Baron Ferrers of Chartley
Born c. 1432
Died 22 August 1485
Battle of Bosworth
Spouse(s) Anne de Ferrers
Issue
Sir Robert Devereux of Ferrers
John Devereux, 8th Baron Ferrers of Chartley
Elizabeth Devereux
Anne Devereux
Isabel Devereux
Sir Richard Devereux
Sir Thomas Devereux
Father Sir Walter Devereux
Mother Elizabeth Merbury

Walter Devereux, jure uxoris 7th Baron Ferrers of Chartley KG (c. 1432 – 22 August 1485) was a minor member of the English peerage and a loyal supporter of the Yorkist cause during the Wars of the Roses. He was a member of Edward IV's inner circle, and died fighting for Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth.

Family[edit]

Walter was born about 1432 in Weobley, Herefordshire. His parents were Sir Walter Devereux, Lord Chancellor of Ireland from 1449 to 1450, and his wife Elizabeth Merbury.

His mother was the daughter and heiress of Sir John Merbury, Chief Justice of South Wales, and his first wife, Alice Pembridge.

Marriage[edit]

About 1446, at the age of only thirteen,[1] Walter married Anne de Ferrers, daughter of William de Ferrers 6th Baron Ferrers of Chartley,[2][3] and became Baron Ferrers of Chartley in right of his wife on 26 July 1461.[4] She predeceased him by seventeen years on 9 January 1469, and they had at least six children:

Devereux married secondly a woman named Jane, but they had no children. She survived him, and married secondly to Thomas Vaughan; thirdly to Sir Edward Blount of Sodington; and finally to Thomas Poyntz, Esq., of Alderley, Gloucestershire[4] She was living in 1522.[8]

Career[edit]

On 6 November 1450 the escheator of Buckinghamshire was instructed to deliver the manor of Dorton to Elizabeth, widow of the late Baron Ferrers of Chartley. Inquisition demonstrated that her heir was Anne, wife of Walter Devereux. His father was attainted for treason in 1452 for supporting Richard, Duke of York, on his march to London, and confrontation with the king at Dartford Heath. On 6 March 1453 he attended Parliament as Lord Ferrers, and represented Herefordshire in place of his father. On 17 March 1453 Walter and Anne Devereux were granted livery of her father’s lands as she was 14 years of age or older.[9]

On 20 March 1453 the escheators were order to take the fealty of Walter Devereux for his wife’s lands.[b] On 24 January 1454 the escheator of Warwickshire released to Walter and Anne Devereux her lands there.[c] An agreement was acknowledged on 4 March 1454 between Walter and Anne Devereux and Elizabeth, widow of the late Sir William Ferrers of Charteley, that they will honor her dower rights when she enters the church, and Anne will receive the inheritance of these estates when she is 21 years of age.[10] On 8 June 1455 Urias and Elizabeth de la Hay, and Henry and Joan ap Griffith, granted to Walter Devereux and his father, Sir William Herbert; John Barrow; and Miles Skull a moiety of Wellington manor, and Adzor manor; and 100 acres of land and 20 shillings of rent in Wellington forever. Devereux acquired half the manor of Tonge, Shropshire, on 1 November 1456 as his wife’s inheritance from a distant cousin, Sir Richard Vernon.[11]

Walter Devereux and William Mayell acquired from Henry Gryffith of Bakton and Thomas Herbert of Billingsley the wardship and marriage of Thomas, minor heir of Edmund de Cornewaylle on 1 July 1453.[12] Walter Devereux and his father were appointed on 14 December 1453 to investigate the escape of prisoners in Herefordshire.[13] On 22 May 1455 Richard, 3rd Duke of York, led the Yorkists to victory at the First Battle of St Albans, and captured Henry VI. On 25 May the Duke crowned Henry VI again, and was re-instated as Protector of the Realm. Walter Devereux’s father was pardoned shortly after at the Parliament meeting on 9 July 1455. Over the next several years the Devereux’s carried on an intermittent war with the Tudor’s along the Welsh Marches. Walter Devereux, along with other prominent Yorkists of Herefordshire, were placed under a recognizance of 5000 marks on 13 May 1457 if they did not immediately present themselves for imprisonment at Marshalsea.[14] His father was added to the group on 2 June.

Following his father’s death on 22 April 1459, Walter Devereux assumed his place as the Steward of York’s lands in Radnor, and in the Duke’s retinue.[15] He was with the Duke of York at the Battle of Ludford Bridge on 12 October 1459, but surrendered and threw himself on the King’s mercy when York fled to Ireland following the defeat. Granted his life, he was attainted on 20 November 1459, and his lands awarded to Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham.[16] Devereux was permitted in 1460 to redeem his properties for a fine of 500 marks.[17][18]

On 26 June 1460 the earls of Warwick and Salisbury landed at Sandwich, and raised a Yorkist rebellion. They marched on London, and captured Henry VI at the Battle of Northampton on 10 July 1460. Walter Devereux was appointed to arrest and imprison any in Herefordshire resisting the rebellion,[19][20] Richard of York returned to England and Walter Devereux attended Parliament on 7 October as a knight of the shire for Herefordshire. The Duke became Protector of the Realm again on 31 October, and Devereux was granted a general pardon.

In December 1460 Walter Devereux accompanied Edward, Earl of March, to Wales to raise an army to counter a Lancastrian rebellion led by the Tudor’s. On 30 December Richard, 3rd Duke of York, was killed at the Battle of Wakefield, and a Lancastrian army moved south towards London. Devereux fought on behalf of Edward, now the 4th Duke of York, at his victory in the Battle of Mortimer's Cross on 2 February 1461, and commanded his left wing.[21] He remained at the side of the future Edward IV on his advance from Gloucester to London. The Lancastrian army marching south was again victorious at the Second Battle of St Albans on 17 February, and recovered Henry VI here. On 3 March 1461, Walter Devereux was present at the council held at Baynard’s Castle where it was resolved that Edward would be made King, and rode at his side to Westminster where Henry VI was deposed in absentia and Edward IV proclaimed King of England.

Walter Devereux was with the army as Edward IV marched north, and fought in the victory at the Battle of Towton on 29 March 1461, where he was knighted.[22] On 8 July Devereux was appointed Justice of the Peace, and place on the Commission of Array for Herefordshire, Gloucestershire, and Shropshire to raise troops to stamp out Lancastrian resistance in Wales.[23] He was also placed on a commission of Oyer and terminer to inquire into all treasons, insurrections and rebellions in South Wales, and granted the authority to receive submission into the king’s peace of rebels.[24] In September Walter Devereux met with the king and William Herbert at Ludlow Castle where they were assigned to take into the king’s hands all the castles, lordships, manors, land and possessions of the late Humphrey, Duke of Buckingham, in South Wales.[25] On 30 September 1461, Herbert and Devereux captured Pembroke Castle. On 16 October Herbert and Devereux defeated the Lancastrians under Pembroke and Exeter at the Battle of Twt Hill effectively ending resistance in Wales. Walter Devereux attended Parliament on 4 November 1461, but was back in Wales for the capture of Denbigh Castle in January 1462.

On 10 February 1462 Devereux is again Justice of the Peace for Herefordshire and Gloucestershire, and will effectively retain these offices for the rest of his life, and at times extend his authority to Shropshire as well.[26][27][28] On 20 February 1462 Devereux received an extensive grant of forfeited lands for his service,[29] and is assigned to raise further troops in Herefordshire and Gloucestershire. John Salwey granted the manor of Stanford, Worcestershire, to Walter Devereux on 18 April, and Herbert and Devereux captured Carreg Cennen Castle in Wales in May 1462.

In October 1462 Margaret of Anjou landed and raised a Lancastrian rebellion in northern England. Devereux accompanied King Edward on an expedition to the north in November 1462, which put the rebellion down by January 1463. Walter attended Parliament on 29 April 1463 where he was rewarded with an exemption from the crown’s Act of Resumption revoking various gifts and grants.[d]

On 18 June 1463 Devereux was appointed as Constable of Aberystwyth Castle for life,[30] and 10 August 1464 joint keeper of the Haywood in Herefordshire.[31] In late 1467 he was granted Oyer and terminer in Wales with power to pardon or arrest, and specifically tasked with investigating counterfeiting, clipping, sweating and other falsifications of money.[32] This was extended into Herefordshire, Warwickshire, Worcestershire, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire, and Shropshire in early 1468,[33] and Devonshire and Gloucestershire later in the year.[34] Devereux was further rewarded on 30 May 1468 with the grant of the custody of all castles, lordships, manors, lands, rents, and possessions with knights’ fees, advowsons, courts leet, views of frankpledge, fairs, markets, privileges and franchises of the late Sir Roger Corbet,[35] and in the king’s hands by reason of the minority his son and heir, Richard.[e] In June 1468 Jasper Tudor, 1st Earl of Pembroke, landed near Harlech Castle and captured Denbigh. Walter Devereux and William Herbert were assigned to raise an army in Gloucestershire, Herefordshire, Shropshire, and the marches of Wales to attack the rebels;[36] and on 14 August 1468 Harlech castle finally surrendered to the Yorkists.

In 1468 Edward IV announced his intent to invade France. On 3 August 1468 Walter Devereux was assigned to muster at Gravesend with his men for service overseas,[37] but other events in the kingdom prevented this from occurring. On 12 February 1469 he was commanded to deliver prisoners to the gaol of Hereford Castle.[38] On 22 May he was appointed to a commission of Oyer and terminer for the counties of York, Cumberland, and Westmoreland; and the city of York.[39] He was probably at the Battle of Edgecote Moor on 26 July 1469 when the Earl of Warwick defeated King Edward, and Devereux’s brother-in-law, William Herbert, was killed. Edward IV was captured, but Warwick was forced to release him within a few months. By September 1469 Walter Devereux was assigned to raise new troops for the Yorkists in Herefordshire, Gloucestershire, Shropshire, and Worcestershire.[40] On 16 November he was rewarded with the grant of the offices of Constable of the Castles of Brecon, Hay, and Huntington; and Steward of the Lordships of Brecon, Hay and Huntington during the minority of Henry Stafford.[41]

On 6 January 1470 he was granted Oyer and terminer over Wales.[42] He probably fought for Edward IV at the resounding victory of the Battle of Losecoat Field, which resulted in the flight of the earl of Warwick and Duke of Clarence to France. On 26 March Devereux was assigned to raise additional troops in Herefordshire to defend against the rebels.[43] On 28 July 1470 he was rewarded with appointment as sheriff of Caernarfonshire and Master-Forester of the Snowdon Hills in North Wales for life.[44]

On 13 September 1470 after Edward IV had been lured north to deal with rebels, Warwick landed at Plymouth raising a Lancastrian rebellion in his rear. Edward was forced to flee to Flanders, and Henry VI was readapted to the throne of England on 3 October. When Edward IV returns landing at Ravenspur, Yorkshire, on 14 March 1471, Devereux joined him for the victory at the Battle of Barnet on 14 April 1471, which deposed Henry VI once again. Walter Devereux was assigned to raise more troops in Shropshire, and Herefordshire,[45] and fought at the Battle of Tewkesbury on 4 May 1471 where Edward IV finally secured his throne. Devereux is at the king’s side when he entered London in triumph, and was one of the Lords who swore in the Parliament Chamber at Westminster on 3 July 1471 to accept Edward, Prince of Wales, as heir to the crown.[46] On 27 August he was granted the power to receive the submission of all rebels in South Wales and the marches,[47] and to raise an army in South Wales, Worcestershire, Gloucestershire, Herefordshire, Shropshire, and the marches to resist Jasper Tudor.[48]

He was selected on 20 February 1473 to serve on the Council of Wales as a tutor and councilor of the king’s heir until the Prince of Wales reached the age of 14 years.[49] On 26 February 1474 he was assigned to raise troops in Herefordshire and Shropshire to suppress another rebellion.[50] On 1 July Margaret, widow of John Walsh and wife of Henry Turner, remised and quitclaimed (for 9L annually during her life) to Walter Devereux the following in Cheshunt, Hertfordshire: Andrews manor; 1 messuage, 20 acres of land, and 20 acres of pasture; and a moiety of La Mote manor. She also quitclaimed 1 messuage in Holborn (London). On 25 October Walter Devereux, Lord Dacre, and the king’s chaplain were granted the collation to the next vacant prebend in the king’s College of St George within Windsor Castle.[51][52]

On 26 May 1475 Devereux and others were granted a license to found a perpetual guild in St Bride's Church near his London properties.[53] He was with Edward IV when he led an army into France in July, and at the Conference at Saint-Christ in Vermandois, France, on 13 August where the king agreed to withdraw in exchange for a yearly payment.[54] Devereux was rewarded on 31 January 1476 with the grant of the manor and lordship of Wigston, Leicestershire, in the king’s hands following the attainder of John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford; and the Welshman, a brewhouse outside Ludgate in the ward of Farringdon Without (St Martin parish, London).[55]

Over the next 4 years Walter Devereux served on various commissions of Oyer and terminer in Middlesex, Yorkshire, and London.[56] On 14 February 1480 he is identified as a member of the king’s council hearing petitions in the Star Chamber at Westminster.[57] Devereux was assigned on 12 June 1481 to survey the land of the king’s lordship of Cheshunt, Hertfordshire; the land of Thomas, abbot of Waltham, in Essex; and the boundary between the counties there.[58]

As a member of the Council of Wales, Walter Devereux was probably with Edward V when he was declared king following the sudden death of Edward IV on 9 April 1483. It would be expected that he accompanied Edward as he set out for London, and was probably among the retinue that was dismissed when Richard, Duke of Glouucester intercepted them at Stony Stratford, Buckinghamshire on 29 April. Following the deposition of Edward V and crowning of the Duke as Richard III on 6 July 1483, Walter Devereux transferred his allegiance to the new king and was confirmed as Justice of the Peace for Herefordshire, Gloucestershire, Shropshire, and Hertfordshire. On 1 August Walter Devereux of Ferrers; his son, Sir John Devereux of Ferrers; and others were assigned in Herefordshire to assess and appoint collectors of the subsidies granted by the last Parliament from aliens (with the exception of the nations and merchants of Spain, Brittany and Almain).[59] Devereux attended Parliament on 23 January 1484,[60] and was assigned to raise an army on 1 May 1484 in Hertfordshire, and Herefordshire.[61] He was rewarded with the grant of Cheshunt manor, Hertfordshire, for life on 12 August;[62] and assigned to investigate certain treasons and offenses committed by William Colingbourne late of Lidyard, Wiltshire; and John Turburville late of Firemayne, Dorset.[63]

Elevation to Peerage and Honors[edit]

On 26 July 1461 Walter Devereux was raised to the rank of Baron in right of his wife and on account of his great services against Henry VI, the Duke of Exeter, the earls of Pembroke and Wiltshire, and the other rebels and traitors, thereby becoming Lord Ferrers.

On 24 April 1472 he was honored by creation as a Knight of the Garter.

Death[edit]

Walter Devereux supported Richard III of England during his reign, and fought by his side at the Battle of Bosworth (22 August 1485). There, Lord Ferrers commanded in the vanguard under John Howard, Duke of Norfolk, alongside Sir Robert Brackenbury and Thomas Howard, Earl of Surrey. Devereux was slain during the initial fight with the opposing van under John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford, fighting next to the young John, Lord Zouche. An in-law, Sir John Ferrers, was also killed at Bosworth. He was attainted after his death on 7 November 1485.

Specific References[edit]

  1. ^ Devereux Papers. Longleat House. Box I.8. Entail of manors on Walter his son and Anne, daughter of Lord Ferrers, 1446.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Evelyn Philip Shirley. Stemmata Shirleiana. (Westminster: Nichols and Sons, 1873). page 103 to 104
  3. ^ Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Henry VI, Volume V, 1446-1452. (London: Anthony Brothers, 1909). Page 19, 26 Nov 1446
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Charles Mosley (editor). Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition. Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, 1999. Volume 1, pages1378-80
  5. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 627
  6. ^ Horrox 2004.
  7. ^ 'Deeds: C.1301 - C.1400', A Descriptive Catalogue of Ancient Deeds: Volume 1 (1890), pp. 517-526 Retrieved 19 July 2013.
  8. ^ Hoyle, Military Survey of Gloucestershire (1993): 54
  9. ^ Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Henry VI, Volume VI, 1452-1461. (London: Wyman and Sons, 1910). Page 49, membrane 4, 17 March 1453
  10. ^ CT Flower (editor). Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry VI: Volume 6, 1454-1461. (London, 1947), pp. 50.
  11. ^ CT Flower (editor). Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry VI: Volume 6, 1454-1461. (London, 1947), pp. 165.
  12. ^ Calendar of the Fine Rolls, Henry VI, Volume 19, 1452-1469. (London, 1939). Page 36-37
  13. ^ Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Henry VI, Volume VI, 1452-1461. (London: Wyman and Sons, 1910). Page 166, 14 Dec1453
  14. ^ CT Flower (editor). Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry VI: Volume 6, 1454-1461. (London, 1947), Page 223
  15. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, 1461-1467. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1897). Page 151, membrane 5, 3 Dec 1462
  16. ^ Collectanea Topographica & Genealogica, Volume I. (London: John Bowyer Nichols and Son, 1834). Page 232
  17. ^ Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Henry VI, Volume VI, 1452-1461. (London: Wyman and Sons, 1910). Page 548, 12 Feb 1460; 552, 22 Mar 1460
  18. ^ CT Flowers (editor). Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry VI: Volume 6, 1454-1461. (London, 1947), pp. 444, 446.
  19. ^ Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Henry VI, Volume VI, 1452-1461. (London: Wyman and Sons, 1910). Page 607, 28 July 1460
  20. ^ Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Henry VI, Volume VI, 1452-1461. (London: Wyman and Sons, 1910). Page 612, 13 Aug 1460
  21. ^ John Sadler. The Red Rose and the White: The Wars of the Roses, 1453-1487. (New York: Rutledge, 2013. Chapter 7
  22. ^ William Arthur Shaw. The Knights of England. A complete record from the earliest time to the present day of the knights of all the orders of chivalry in England, Scotland, and Ireland, and of the knights bachelors, incorporating a complete list of knights bachelors dubbed in Ireland. (London: London Sherratt and Hughes, 1902). Volume 2, page 13
  23. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, 1461-1467. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1897). Page 36, membrane 8d, 8 July 1461; Page 98, membrane 27d, 12 Aug 1461
  24. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, 1461-1467. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1897). Page 38 and 45, 12 Aug 1461
  25. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, 1461-1467. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1897). Page 100, membrane 25d, 7 Sep 1461
  26. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, 1461-1467. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1897). Page 564
  27. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 611-12, 614-16, 627-29, 635-36
  28. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, Edward V, and Richard III, 1476-1485. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1901). Page 560-62, 570
  29. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, 1461-1467. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1897). Page 153, membrane 1, 20 Feb 1462
  30. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, 1461-1467. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1897). Page 270, membrane 8, 18 June 1463
  31. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, 1461-1467. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1897). Page 336, membrane 7, 10 Aug 1464
  32. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 54, membrane 19d, 14 Aug 1467 and 27 Oct 1467; Page 57, membrane 6d, 15 Feb 1468
  33. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 55, membrane 8d, 13 Jan 1468; Page 69-70, membrane 17d, 13 Feb 1468
  34. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 126-127, membrane 22d, 3 Aug 1468
  35. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 95, membrane 8, 30 May 1468; Page 444, membrane 18, 15 June 1474
  36. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 103, Membrane 12d, 3 July 1468
  37. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 127, 3 Aug 1468
  38. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 140, membrane 14d, 12 Feb 1469
  39. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 170-1, membrane 9d, 22 May 1469
  40. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 172, membrane 1d, 13 Sep 1469; Page 195, membrane 19d, 29 Oct 1469
  41. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 175, membrane 20, 16 Nov 1469
  42. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 198, membrane 17d, 6 Jan 1470
  43. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 219, membrane 10d, 26 Mar 1470
  44. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 212, membrane 6, 28 July 1470
  45. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 284, membrane 25, 26 Apr 1471
  46. ^ WHB Bird and KH Ledward (editors). Calendar of Close Rolls, Edward IV: Volume 2, 1468-1476. (London, 1953) Page 222
  47. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 283, membrane 1, 27 Aug 1471
  48. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 289, membrane 1d, 27 Aug 1471
  49. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 366, membrane 21, 20 Feb 1473
  50. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 429, membrane 10d, 26 Feb 1474
  51. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 469, membrane 21, 25 Oct 1474
  52. ^ 'Fines for divers and other counties: Edward IV', in A Calendar To the Feet of Fines For London and Middlesex: Volume 1, Richard I - Richard III, ed. W J Hardy and W Page (London, 1892), pp. 239-240
  53. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 553, membrane 19, 26 May 1475
  54. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 583, membrane 24, 16 May 1476
  55. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV and Henry VI, 1467-1477. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1900). Page 565, membrane 8, 31 Jan 1476
  56. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, Edward V, and Richard III, 1476-1485. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1901). Page 50, membrane 8d, 12 May 1477; Page 145, membrane 10d, 4 January 1479; Page 183-184, membrane 2d, 18 Feb 1480
  57. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, Edward V, and Richard III, 1476-1485. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1901). Page 219, membrane 26 26 April 1480
  58. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, Edward V, and Richard III, 1476-1485. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1901). Page 288, membrane 10d, 12 June 1481
  59. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, Edward V, and Richard III, 1476-1485. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1901). Page 394, membrane 24d, 1 Aug 1483
  60. ^ KH Ledward (editor). Calendar of Close Rolls, Edward IV, Edward V, Richard III 1476-1485. (London, 1954), Page 332
  61. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, Edward V, and Richard III, 1476-1485. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1901). Page 401, membrane 19d, 1 May 1484,
  62. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, Edward V, and Richard III, 1476-1485. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1901). Page 513, membrane 4, 12 Aug 1484
  63. ^ Great Britain Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Edward IV, Edward V, and Richard III, 1476-1485. (London: H.M. Stationary Office, 1901). Page 519, membrane 20d, 29 Nov 1484

General References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Sir Robert Devereux of Ferrers was appointed as Justice of the Peace for Shropshire on 24 February 1473, and again 8 Nov 1473
  2. ^ Chinnor manor, Oxfordforshire, held for 1/100 fee; a moiety of Kingston Bagpuize manor, Berkshire, held for 1/100 fee; Little Paxton manor (of the honour of Huntingdon) held for the twentieth part of a fee, two-thirds of Mawgryth manor in the parish of Little Paxton held for the six hundredth part of a fee, and 200 acres of woods in Southoe, Huntingdonshire, being 2/3 of Ferrers manor held for 2/3 fee and 2/3 of Eynesbury manor held for 1/100 fee (called 'Ferrer’s Park,' 'Hawt' and 'Whythye'); a cottage and 38 gardens in the parishes of St. Bride and St. Dunstan Fleet Street in the ward of Farringdon Without, London, held of the king in free burgage; and Chartley manor (of the honour of Chester) for a fourth part of a fee, a messuage, 40 acres of land and 20 acres of meadow in Ruggeley, a messuage, 40 acres of land, 11 acres of meadow and 10 acres of pasture in Morton, all in Staffordshire
  3. ^ 2 closes in Bordesley called 'Couperesfeldys' containing 40 acres of land; diverse other closes there, three called 'Parkefeldys' and others called 'Hidleys,' 'Stokhay' and 'Wallefelde' containing 40 acres of land; and 1 acre of land in the town called 'Parrok'
  4. ^ This was elaborated upon in the Parliament of 3 June 1467 as follows: Provided always that this act, or any other act made or to be made in this present parliament, shall not extend or be prejudicial to Walter VII Devereux, knight, Lord Ferrers, or to the male heirs begotten of his body with regard to any grant made by us to him and to his heirs begotten of his body of the manor and lordship of Sutton Courtenay with the appurtenances in Berkshire, and of the advowson of the church of Sutton Courtenay, and of twelve messuages, thirty acres of land, 100 acres of pasture, thirty acres of meadow, twenty acres of woodland, four knights' fees and £10 of rent in Sutton Courtenay and Hawkridge in the same county; and of the manor of Hillesden with the appurtenances in the county of Buckingham; and of six messuages, 100 acres of land, ten acres of meadow, twenty acres of pasture, twenty acres of woodland and 20s. of rent in the aforesaid Hillesden, which were formerly of Thomas Courtenay, late earl of Devon; and of the one half of the manor of Richards Castle with the appurtenances in the counties of Hereford and Shropshire, which were formerly of William Vaux, knight; and of the one half of the manor of Long Compton in the county of Warwick, and of the manors of Oxenhall, Oakle and Cold Ashton with their appurtenances in the county of Gloucester which were formerly of James, late earl of Wiltshire; and of the manor of Tilton with the appurtenances in the county of Leicester, and of fourteen messuages, four tofts, twenty-four yardlands, eighty acres of meadow, two acres of pasture, thirty acres of woodland and 10s. of rent with the appurtenances in the aforesaid Tilton; and of three messuages, eight tofts, ten yardlands, ten acres of meadow and 20s. of rent with the appurtenances in Billesdon, and of a toft [and] two yardlands with the appurtenances in Halstead in the same county of Leicester, six messuages, 200 acres of land, twenty acres of meadow and 20s. of rent with the appurtenances in Eynesbury and Offord in the county of Huntingdon, which were formerly of Everard Digby, esquire; and of the manors of Baumber and Elkington with the appurtenances in the county of Lincoln, and of ten messuages, 200 acres of land, twenty acres of meadow, sixty acres of pasture, forty acres of woodland and 20s. of rent with the appurtenances in Baumber and Elkington in the same county of Lincoln which were formerly of William Tailboys, knight; and of all knights' fees, advowsons of churches, chapels, chantries and all other spiritual benefices, court leets, views of frankpledge, parks, warrens, vineyards, fairs, markets, liberties, franchises, profits, commodities and emoluments pertaining or belonging to the same manors: but that our said letters patent and everything contained in them shall be good, effectual and valid to the said Walter, and to his said male heirs begotten of his body, by whatever name or names the said Walter, or any of the said persons named in this proviso, or any of the things stated, or any thing contained or included [col. b] in our said letters patent are named or called; notwithstanding in any way the said act, or any other made or to be made in this present parliament.
  5. ^ Walter Devereux had Richard Corbet marry his daughter, Elizabeth, probably around 15 June 1474 when he requested confirmation of his right to arrange the marriage
Peerage of England
Preceded by
William Ferrers
Baron Ferrers of Chartley
(jure uxoris
by Anne Ferrers)

1462–1485
Succeeded by
John Devereux

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