Warwick Fairfax

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For his grandfather, the newspaper publisher, see Warwick Oswald Fairfax

Warwick Fairfax
Born December 1960 (age 56)
Residence Annapolis, Maryland, United States
Nationality Australian
Citizenship Australian
Alma mater
Occupation Business consultant
Executive coach
Known for Privatisation of John Fairfax Holdings Limited
Spouse(s) Gale
Children 3
Parent(s)
Relatives
Website fairfaxadvisers.com

Warwick Fairfax (born December 1960) is an Australian businessman and consultant based in the United States.[1] He was well known in the 1990s as the media heir who privatised the publicly-listed media company, John Fairfax Holdings Limited in 1987; only for the privatised company to fail three years later.[2][3]

Biography[edit]

Fairfax was the son of Warwick Oswald Fairfax and his third wife, Mary. Fairfax was educated at both Oxford and Harvard.[1][self-published source?][3] He is married with three children and serves as an Elder at Bay Area Community Church.[3]

In 1987, following the death of his father, the 26-year-old 'young Warwick' successfully took over the then publicly-listed John Fairfax Holdings Limited but on 10 December 1990 the company collapsed and a receiver was appointed. The controversial method of financing and purchasing holdings of the established company from family members and the consequential problems arising in the media group in later years are still cited today in Australian media history.[2][3][4]

In 1991, he migrated to the United States and settled in Annapolis, Maryland, where he founded a business consultancy and executive coach business.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Fairfax Consulting - Warwick Bio". www.fairfaxadvisers.com. Retrieved 21 May 2015. 
  2. ^ a b Ricketson, Matthew (7 December 2006). "Family affair again after days of young Warwick". The Age. Retrieved 21 May 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Smyth, Terry (2 November 2008). "Rising after the fall". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 21 May 2015. 
  4. ^ "The story of The Age newspaper". The Age. 22 September 2007. Archived from the original on 21 September 2007. Retrieved 11 April 2016. 

Further reading[edit]

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