Welfare State International

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For the concept of government in which the state plays a key role in the protection and promotion of the economic and social well-being of its citizens, see Welfare state

Welfare State International was a British experimental theatre group formed in 1968 by John Fox[1] and Sue Gill[2], Roger Coleman[3] and others.[4] It became "A collective of radical artists and thinkers who explored ideas of celebratory art and spectacle between 1968 and 2006."[3]

Background[edit]

The company's name was originally 'The Welfare State', based on the concept of offering art for all on the same basis as education and health.[3][5][6]

Welfare State International was initially known for staging large-scale outdoor spectacular events. At this time (the late 1960s), forsaking theatres and galleries for the street was unusual.

In November 2001, Welfare State International was described by the Guardian Guide as "Britain's foremost arts and installations collective."[7] Welfare State International's 'The Raising of the Titanic' (Limehouse Basin, London, 1983) has been listed among "Productions that transformed theatre".[8]

Welfare State International ceased operating on April Fools' Day 2006 after a performance at Ulverston.[1][2]

See also[edit]

Techniques[edit]

Related companies[edit]

Former members[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Dead Good Guides page for John Fox". deadgoodguides.com. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Dead Good Guides page for Sue Gill". deadgoodguides.com. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  3. ^ a b c "Welfare State International - About WSI". welfare-state.org. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  4. ^ Nuttall, Jeff (1979). Performance Art Memoirs. 1. John Calder. p. 72. ISBN 0714537888.
  5. ^ Whiteley, Gillian. "'New Age' radicalism and the social imagination: Welfare State International in the Seventies" (PDF). 1970sproject.co.uk.[dead link]
  6. ^ Whiteley, Gillian. "'New Age' radicalism and the social imagination: Welfare State International in the Seventies" (PDF). dspace.lboro.ac.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  7. ^ "Welfare State International - John Fox". welfare-state.org. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  8. ^ "Guardian article (2009/apr/01) Experimental theatre to spill into the mainstream". theguardian.com. Retrieved 26 May 2018.