Western Growers Association

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The Western Growers Association (WGA) is an association representing family farmers who grow fresh produce and tree nuts in California, Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico. [1][2][3] The issues they advocate on include farm labor regulation, immigration and guest worker programs, environment and sustainability, pest control, and water.[4] They have offices in Sacramento (California), Phoenix (Arizona), and Washington, D.C.

History[edit]

WGA was founded in 1926.[1][3]

Reception[edit]

The WGA has been cited in articles in the New York Times on issues related to agriculture and regulation thereof, and in particular immigration and guest worker programs associated with agricultural labor.[5][6][7][8][9] It has also been cited and quoted as an authority on produce, farm labor and immigration issues in articles in Forbes,[10] CNN,[11][12] and the Wall Street Journal.[13][14][15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Our Mission and Vision". Western Growers Association. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  2. ^ "Company Overview of Western Growers Association". Bloomberg Business. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  3. ^ a b "Western Growers Association". Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  4. ^ "Issues and Advocacy". Western Growers Association. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  5. ^ Pear, Robert (January 27, 1985). "U.S. PLANS TO EASE ALIEN LABOR RULES". New York Times. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  6. ^ "U.S. Official Blames Farmers For Worker Shortage in West". New York Times (originally from Associated Press). June 21, 1987. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  7. ^ Schneider, Keith (February 22, 1990). "Growers Reach for the Ballot in California Duel Over Pesticides". New York Times. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  8. ^ Preston, Julia (September 5, 2007). "Short on Labor, Farmers in U.S. Shift to Mexico". New York Times. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
  9. ^ Medina, Jennifer (March 29, 2014). "California Farmers Short of Labor, and Patience". New York Times. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  10. ^ Powell, Benjamin (October 18, 2013). "A U.S. Worker Shortage Calls For 'Red Card' Immigration Reform". Forbes. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  11. ^ Ellis, David (September 15, 2006). "Food industry mulls 'killer spinach' impact Growers gauge effects of FDA E. Coli warning. Grocers, restaurants remove product from shelves, menus". CNN (Money). Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  12. ^ Liberto, Jennifer (July 11, 2014). "Business wants immigration reform. Why? Because they can't find enough workers". CNN (Money. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  13. ^ Jordan, Miriam (March 11, 2005). "As Border Tightens, Growers See Threat to 'Winter Salad Bowl'. Yuma, Ariz., Relies on Muscle From Illegal Immigrants; Security vs. Economics". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  14. ^ Murray, Sara (April 12, 2013). "Agricultural Visa Program Finds Accord". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  15. ^ Jordan, Miriam (November 23, 2014). "Farmers Urge Congress to Legalize Agriculture Workers. Obama Move Will Help Only a Fraction of the Undocumented Immigrants Toiling on Nation's Fields, Farmers Say". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved February 9, 2015.

External links[edit]

Official website