While the Sun Shines

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While the Sun Shines
While the Sun Shines (1947 film).jpg
Directed byAnthony Asquith
Produced byAnatole de Grunwald
Written byTerence Rattigan
Anatole de Grunwald
Based onWhile the Sun Shines by Terence Rattigan
StarringBarbara White
Ronald Squire
Brenda Bruce
Bonar Colleano
Michael Allan
Music byNicholas Brodzsky
Philip Green
CinematographyJack Hildyard
Edited byFrederick Wilson
Production
company
Distributed byAssociated British-Pathé (UK)
Stratford Pictures Corporation (US)
Release date
  • 1 February 1947 (1947-02-01) (London, UK)
Running time
82 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Box office£146,173 (UK)[1]

While the Sun Shines is a 1947 British comedy film directed by Anthony Asquith and starring Barbara White, Ronald Squire, Brenda Bruce, Bonar Colleano, and Michael Allan.[2] It was based on Terence Rattigan's 1943 play of the same name.[3]

Plot[edit]

Lady Elisabeth Randall is an English Air Force corporal during World War II. She is on her way to marry her fiancé when she finds herself being romanced by two different men. The first man is Colbert, a Frenchman residing in England. The second man is Joe Mulvaney, an American lieutenant. Difficulties ensue as Lady Elisabeth finds that due to these romances both her military career and her impending marriage are in danger.

Cast[edit]

Critical reception[edit]

TV Guide wrote that "The direction never convinces the viewer that this story was meant to be told anywhere but on the stage";[4] and in his book Anthony Asquith, Tom Ryall noted that the film "reflected the tone though not the success of its stage predecessor."[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vincent Porter, 'The Robert Clark Account', Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, Vol 20 No 4, 2000 p483
  2. ^ "While the Sun Shines (1947) - Overview - TCM.com". Turner Classic Movies.
  3. ^ http://ftvdb.bfi.org.uk/sift/title/57842
  4. ^ "While The Sun Shines". TVGuide.com.
  5. ^ Ryall, Tom (15 October 2011). "Anthony Asquith". Oxford University Press – via Google Books.

External links[edit]