Whitcombe Church

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Whitcombe Church
Whitcombe - parish church of lost dedication - geograph.org.uk - 533554.jpg
Location Whitcombe, Dorset, England
Coordinates 50°41′37″N 2°24′09″W / 50.69361°N 2.40250°W / 50.69361; -2.40250Coordinates: 50°41′37″N 2°24′09″W / 50.69361°N 2.40250°W / 50.69361; -2.40250
Built 12th century
Listed Building – Grade I
Official name: Parish Church (Dedication Unknown)
Designated 26 July 1956[1]
Reference no. 105986
Whitcombe Church is located in Dorset
Whitcombe Church
Location of Whitcombe Church in Dorset

Whitcombe Church in Whitcombe, Dorset, England was built in the 12th century. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building,[1] and is now a redundant church in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.[2] It was declared redundant on 29 October 1971, and was vested in the Trust on 12 February 1973.[3]

The site of the church was used for worship in the Saxon era and there are fragments of two Saxon crosses. The nave of Whitcombe Church dates from the 12th century, with the chancel being added in the 15th. The tower was added in the late 16th century.[2]

The interior includes several wall paintings, including one of St Christopher, and a 13th-century Purbeck marble font.[2]

William Barnes the English writer, poet, minister, and philologist was the curate at Whitcombe from 1847 to 1852, and again from 1862 preaching his first and last sermons in the church.[2] He wrote over 800 poems, some in Dorset dialect and much other work including a comprehensive English grammar quoting from more than 70 different languages.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Historic England, "Parish Church (Dedication Unknown) (1119215)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 April 2015 
  2. ^ a b c d The Church (no dedication), Whitcombe, Dorset, Churches Conservation Trust, retrieved 31 March 2011 
  3. ^ Diocese of Salisbury: All Schemes (PDF), Church Commissioners/Statistics, Church of England, 2011, p. 11, retrieved 31 March 2011