Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Musical Instruments

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WikiProject Musical Instruments (Rated Project-class)
WikiProject icon This page is within the scope of WikiProject Musical Instruments, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of musical instruments on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
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Piano burning[edit]

Does piano burning only involve uprights, or does it also include baby grands, and grand pianos? -- 70.51.44.60 (talk) 06:35, 6 November 2015 (UTC)

First sentence includes "most commonly an upright" and section 3.1 includes "centred on a burning grand piano", so the question is answered in the article! Martin of Sheffield (talk) 09:16, 6 November 2015 (UTC)

New userbox created![edit]

I created a new userbox for the project! I have already done all the edits to the lists that list userboxes and on the userbox page itself. Plus, I have tested it and it works beautifully! --Xavier (talk) 06:58, 7 November 2015 (UTC)

Piano burning needs eyes[edit]

Both the legends concerning the origins of its practice in the US and UK air forces are clearly designated as "legendary" in the article. In addition, the article states that there no evidence to suggest that descriptions of its origin have any historical authenticity four times, including in the lead. In my view (expressed on Talk:Piano burning), a complete account of the subject also requires an account of the two main legends surrounding the practice. This is standard practice in Wikipedia articles on everything from haunted castles to witchcraft to ancient Greek figures. Yet, two IPs (50.192.73.146 and 216.3.207.34) both tracing to Houston, Texas and undoubtedly the same person, have been repeatedly removing the accounts of the legends with no discussion or explanation whatsoever. In the process, they strand references, add inappropriate editorialising commentary, add statements before references which do not support the statements, and have repeatedly damaged the coherence and punctuation of the text. This article has few watchers. Could member here put some more eyes on it and/or add to the discussion I started on the talk page? Voceditenore (talk) 07:29, 9 November 2015 (UTC)

Problem with banner template[edit]

Just pinging page watchers, please see this discussion. Eman235/talk 05:33, 3 December 2015 (UTC)

Fife size nomenclature[edit]

The Fife page describes well the notational transposition conventions for Bb and Ab fifes. Those conventions are applicable to any size fife. What it does not do is to describe the nomenclature conventions for different size fifes. I don't play fife, but I believe that, for six-hole fifes, what is termed a "Bb fife" is one which, with all holes closed and playing its lowest note, is an instrument that sounds a concert Bb. Similarly an "Ab fife" is one which, with all holes closed and playing its lowest note, is an instrument that sounds a concert Ab.

The relationship between the acoustic pitch name of an instrument and the notational convention name can be tricky.

A baritone horn which is acoustically a Bb instrument is notationally a C instrument (i.e. the notator expects that written C should cause a concert C to sound) when notated in bass clef but notationally a Bb instrument when notated in treble clef (i.e. the notator expects that written C should cause a concert Bb to sound).

A D lysarden (thumb hole, six finger holes in front) sounds G when the left hand holes (thumb and upper three finger) holes are closed. A C lysarden (thumb hole, six finger holes in front, and a seventh hole covered by a key) also sounds G when the left hand holes (thumb and upper three finger) holes are closed. Notationally, both instruments are C instruments (notated C should sound concert C).

The bottom line is that when describing an instrument as being in some pitch (e.g. in Bb) there are two distinct nomenclatures that are often not the same. There is the acoustical pitch, the concert pitch produced with a clearly specified fingering or other configuration (e.g. woodwind fingering, brass key positions, trombone slide position, guitar fret position and string). This is fixed by the physics of the instrument and is immutable (at least for woodwinds--strings can tune up or down cf. scordatura). Then there is the notational convention, which describes what pitch is expected to be produced when a C is written on the page. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Strepthroat (talkcontribs) 04:08, 29 December 2015 (UTC)