Homer Hamilton

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William Homer Hamilton (February 6, 1913[1] in Carman, Manitoba[2] – September 29, 1997) was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He was a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1959 to 1969.[1]

The son of John Love Hamilton and Sadie Louise Kilpatrick, Hamilton was educated in Sperling and at Dominion Business College.[2] In 1932, he became manager of the Ogilvie Flour Mills elevator in Saltcoats, Saskatchewan, returning to Manitoba in 1936. Hamilton worked as a grain farmer until 1963.[3] He was appointed Drainage Maintenance Superintendent of Dufferin in 1946, and became a trustee on the Sperling Cons. School in 1951. He retained the latter position while serving in the Manitoba legislature. In 1940. Hamilton married Helen June Wickend.[2]

He first ran for the Manitoba legislature in the 1958 provincial election, but lost to Liberal-Progressive incumbent Walter McDonald by 73 votes in the riding of Dufferin.[4] The Progressive Conservatives won a majority government in the 1959 provincial election, and Hamilton defeated McDonald by 154 votes to take the seat on his second try. He was re-elected by greater margins in the elections of 1962 and 1966,[1] and served as a backbench supporter of the governments of Dufferin Roblin and Walter Weir. He did not run for re-election in 1969.

After retiring from politics, he worked as constituency secretary for federal member of parliament Jack Murta.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "MLA Biographies - Deceased". Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. Archived from the original on 2014-03-30. 
  2. ^ a b c "William Homer Hamilton (1913-1997)". Memorable Manitobans. Manitoba Historical Society. Retrieved 2013-10-19. 
  3. ^ a b Eidse, Lenore (1980). Furrows in the Valley (PDF). Rural Municipality of Morris. pp. 817–818. Retrieved 2013-10-19. 
  4. ^ "Votes for Social Credit in last election may help". Leader-Post. Regina. May 7, 1959. p. 19. Retrieved 2013-10-19.