William Nixon

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For other uses, see William Nixon (disambiguation).

William Holladay Nixon (born November 29, 1958 in Washington, D.C.) William Holladay Nixon (born November 29, 1958 in Washington, D.C.) is the President and CEO of Policy Impact Communications, a full service firm, that specializes in public and government relations. William worked as a speechwriter for President Ronald Reagan, serving as the chief speech writer for the President’s social and healthcare agenda.[1] Afterwards Nixon served for more than 15 years as a Senior Policy Advisor and speech writer on Capitol Hill, the majority of the time with Republican Senator William Roth of Delaware.[2] Additionally, he worked on the staffs of the United States Senate Committee on Finance, Banking Committees, and Government Affairs Committee.[3] Nixon focused on international relations, trade, health care, taxation, education, and government oversight. Also, he is the author of several published books.[4][5]

Early life[edit]

Nixon grew up in Salt Lake City, Utah, His father, The Hon. William L. Nixon, worked as an attorney and corporate CEO, and later spent 10 years as a judge in the Executive Office of Immigration Review for the U.S. Department of Justice.[6] His mother, Carol Nixon headed the Utah Arts Council of the Utah Division of Arts and Museums.[2] , and is currently the President of Utah Families Foundation. Nixon first became involved in politics as a 16-year-old in the 1976 Senate campaign of Orrin Hatch. It was during that campaign that he became interested in the relationship between politicians, public policy, the media, and the power of persuasive communication, and knew he wanted to become a writer. After serving a two-year mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in Sevilla, Spain, he graduated from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where he attended on a football scholarship, playing alongside National Football League quarterback Randall Cunningham, while simultaneously acting as the editor-in-chief of The Rebel Yell, the student newspaper.[7]

Journalism and literary career[edit]

Nixon began his professional career as a journalist, founding and editing American Times Magazine, a regional conservative publication that focused on politics and culture, and working as associate editor of The Las Vegan City Magazine.[8] He served as editor of Nixon began his professional career as a journalist, founding and editing American Times Magazine, a regional conservative publication that focused on politics and culture, and working as associate editor of The Las Vegan City Magazine. He served as editor of Quicksilver, a literary journal, and in 1990 published his first book, a novel entitled Strategic Compromise which was promoted actively by Orrin Hatch.[9][10][11] Nixon's articles, essays, and short stories have appeared in magazines and journals throughout the world. His work is translated regularly, particularly into Mandarin, Chinese, as he is a monthly contributor to the popular CUP Magazine, often referred to as China's Vanity Fair.

Nixon's articles, essays, and short stories have appeared in magazines and journals throughout the world. His work has translated into various languages. Nixon frequently contributes to the popular Hong Kong publication CUP Magazine.[citation needed]

Lobbying career[edit]

Following more than two decades on Capital Hill, Nixon served as president and chief executive of the Generic Pharmaceutical Association from 1999 to 2001. After In 2001, Nixon was hired by Haley Barbour, former chairman of the Republican National Committee and chairman of Policy Impact Communications to serve as president of the company which was founded by, among others, Barbour and Ed Gillespie in 1996. Upon Barbour's election to serve as Governor of Mississippi in 2003, Nixon became President and CEO of Policy Impact Communications.

As a lobbyist Nixon used his experience in Healthcare to represent the Coalition for Affordable and Reliable Health Care, his involvement led to a majority vote in both houses of Congress to move medical liability reform.[12] Nixon, represented Force Protection Inc. and helped Frank Kanvanaugh turn an idea into a publicly traded company, which was later acquired by General Dynamics in 2011. In 2009, Nixon was hired by the government of Kazakhstan to assist in a public relations campaign in response to the film Borat. During the Bahraini uprising, Policy Impact Communications established the Bahrain American Council to lobby politicians, such as Eni Faleomavaega, to support Bahrain.

Since 2002, William Nixon has represented Li Ka-Shing, Hong Kong business magnate, investor, and philanthropist. In addition, Nixon currently represents CK Hutchison, Horizons Ventures, Li Ka- Shing Foundation, Paul Mitchell Schools, Utah Valley University, CRIT USA, Aleph Institute, Hungarian-American Institute, The American Diabetes Association, and FranklinCovey.

Personal life[edit]

In 1980, he married Tammy Nixon. Together they have three children, and four grandchildren. Their oldest Dr. Brittany May PhD, is currently a professor at Brigham Young University.

Other activities[edit]

Nixon is a Fellow at the University of Utah's Hinckley Institute of Politics and serves as a member of the National Presidential Advisory Board at Utah Valley University.[13]

Nixon is also frequently called upon to speak on governmental issues to groups throughout the country.[14]

ixon served as president of the Mount Vernon Virginia Stake of the LDS Church[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "William Nixon - Chairman and CEO @ Policy Impact | CrunchBase". www.crunchbase.com. Retrieved 2016-05-06. 
  2. ^ "Bill Nixon: Executive Profile & Biography - Businessweek". www.bloomberg.com. Retrieved 2016-05-06. 
  3. ^ "About PIC – Policy Impact Communications". www.policyimpact.com. Retrieved 2016-05-06. 
  4. ^ Nixon, William (1990-07-01). Strategic Compromise: A Novel (First ed.). New York, NY: Birch Lane Pr. ISBN 9781559720267. 
  5. ^ Roth, William V. , Jr; Nixon, William H.; Roth, William V. (1999-04-01). The Power to Destroy (First ed.). New York: Atlantic Monthly Pr. ISBN 9780871137487. 
  6. ^ Tribune, David Montero The Salt Lake. "Immigration court backlogged for more than a year in Utah". The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved 2016-05-06. 
  7. ^ "UNLV Libraries Digital Collections: Rebel Yell, 1991-04-11, THURSDAY EDITION, page 6". digital.library.unlv.edu. Retrieved 2016-05-06. 
  8. ^ "Las Vegan City Magazine - Past Team | CrunchBase". www.crunchbase.com. Retrieved 2016-05-06. 
  9. ^ http://www.deseretnews.com/article/115857/STRATEGIC-COMPROMISE-DRAWS-COMPLIMENTS-FROM-HIGH-PLACES.html?pg=all.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  10. ^ 'Strategic Compromise' Draws Compliments From High Places at deseretnews.com
  11. ^ Utahn Puts Extraordinary Experiences Into a Novel at deseretnews.com
  12. ^ Stolberg, Sheryl Gay (2003-03-12). "Lobbyists on Both Sides Duel in the Medical Malpractice Debate". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-05-06. 
  13. ^ National Presidential Advisory Board at UVU.edu
  14. ^ Voices for Moderation in Utah’s GOP at Salt Lake Tribune
  15. ^ "New stake presidents, Church News, June 19, 2004.