William Ryder (mayor)

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Sir William Ryder (died 30 August 1611)[1] was an English politician and Lord Mayor of London. As mayor, he played a prominent role in quashing the abortive rebellion led by the Earl of Essex, by pubicly proclaiming Essex a traitor, which immediately caused much of his support to melt away.[2]

Sir William Ryder was a member of the Haberdasher's Company, one of the livery companies of London. He served as Sheriff of the City of London in 1592, Alderman in 1595, and Lord Mayor of London for 1600 - 1601. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Stone. He had a son Ferdinando, who predeceased him, and two daughters: Mary, wife of Sir Thomas Lake, Secretary of State, and Susan, third wife of Sir Thomas Caesar, MP and Baron of the Exchequer.[3] He was knighted in 1601. Upon the death of his brother Edward Ryder in 1609, he acquired the manor of Leyton Grange in Essex; this manor had previously been owned by Sir Oliver Cromwell, uncle of the Lord Protector.[4] He died in 1611, and the manor passed to his daughters at his death.[5]

References[edit]

Civic offices
Preceded by
Nicholas Mosley
Robert Broke
Sheriffs of the City of London
1592–1593
With: Benedict Barnham
Succeeded by
John Garrard
Robert Taylor
Preceded by
Nicholas Mosley
Lord Mayor of the City of London
1600–1601
Succeeded by
John Garrard