Wood Boulden

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Wood Boulden
Born January 20, 1811
Charlotte County, Virginia
Died October 10, 1876(1876-10-10) (aged 65)
Occupation Lawyer, Judge
Children Wood Bouldin (Commonwealth's Attorney)
Parent(s) Thomas Bouldin[1]
Relatives James Bouldin (uncle)

Wood Boulden, also known as Wood Bouldin,[2] (January 20, 1811 – October 10, 1876) was a Virginia lawyer, plantation owner and politician.

Early and family life[edit]

Born in Charlotte County, Virginia. In his early youth, he attended a private school in Richmond and later entered New London Academy in Bedford County, Virginia. After teaching school for a year, he moved to Halifax County, Virginia and studied law under William Leigh.

Career[edit]

After admission to the Virginia Bar, Boulden moved to Charlotte Courthouse to begin practice. Seeking a larger practice, he moved to Richmond in 1842 and entered a law partnership with Robert Stanard, who soon became a Judge of the Court of Appeals.

In 1853 Boulden purchased a plantation on Staunton River and practiced law in Charlotte, Halifax and Mecklenburg Counties. Elected to the Virginia Secession Convention of 1861, Boulden favored secession, which resolution passed. During the Civil War, Boulden continued in the Virginia House of Delegates. He received a pardon and he was among those who were in the courtroom when the floor collapsed shortly after the war. He sustained no serious injury but was severely shocked and took a short rest. In 1872, he was elected to the Court of Appeals but his judicial career was relatively short as he died on October 10, 1876.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Watson, Walter Allen (2009). Notes on Southside Virginia. Virginia State Library/Clearfield. p. 157. ISBN 0806307412. Retrieved 12 August 2015. 
  2. ^ Turner Censer, Jane (2003). The Reconstruction of White Southern Womanhood, 1865-1895. Louisiana State University Press. p. 98. ISBN 9780807129210. Retrieved 12 August 2015. 
  3. ^ Tarter, Brent. "Wood Bouldin (1838–1911)". Encyclopedia Virginia. Retrieved 12 August 2015.