Woodlawn and Butternut Street Railway

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Woodlawn and Butternut Street Railway
Locale Syracuse, New York, United States
Dates of operation 1886–1890
Successor Syracuse Consolidated Street Railway
Track gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge
Headquarters Syracuse, New York

The Woodlawn and Butternut Street Railway, a horse-drawn street trolley line in Syracuse, New York, was established in 1886.[1] The road commenced at North Salina Street at the junction of James Street and traveled to Butternut street and Manlius Street with final destination, Woodlawn Cemetery.[1]

The company merged with Syracuse Consolidated Street Railway in 1890, after an agreement was made that allowed the new company to lease the lines.[1]

History[edit]

The Woodlawn and Butternut Street Railway was organized in March 1886, with capital stock of $30,000 and obtained its certificate of incorporation on May 15, 1886.[2] The road commenced at North Salina Street at the junction of James Street and traveled to Butternut street, Manlius street with final destination, Woodlawn Cemetery.[1]

At the same time, the company also bought its first franchise at a public sale in Syracuse which was authorized by the city Common Council on July 24, 1886. The road was built under contract by T. W. Harris & Company of New York City and commenced operation on June 3, 1888.[2]

The line consisted of 43 miles (69 km) of road which ran over the tracks of the Central City Railway Company for which they paid an annual rental. Funded debt consisted of $20,000 with first mortgage bonds due in 1907.[2]

Company management[edit]

In March 1886, directors of the company were John S. Kaufman, Peter Kappesser, Fred Erhard, Louis House, William Dopffel, John Gebhard, Henry Wienheimer, Jacob Grassman, F. Arheidt, Jacob Gilcher, George Scheider, Frank Haberle and Theordore Hipkins, all of Syracuse. President of the company was John S. Kaufman, secretary William Dopffel and treasurer was Fred Erhard. Peter Kappesser was named superintendent.[2]

During 1890, the officers, who had held their positions since 1886 included; J. F. Kaufman, president; L. House, vice-president; Frederick Erhard, treasurer; William Dopffel, secretary and Peter Kappesser, superintendent. The directors of the companywere John Gebhardt, John Moore, Theodore Hipkins, John Dunn, Henry Weinheimer and G. Schieder.[1]

Syracuse consolidated lease agreement[edit]

The Syracuse Consolidated Street Railway was chartered in 1890 in Syracuse and by July 1, 1890, the new company leased, in perpetuity, several street railroads in the city including the Woodlawn and Butternut Street Railway as well as the Third Ward Railway, Fourth Ward Railroad, Fifth Ward Railroad, Seventh Ward Railroad, Eleventh Ward Railroad, New Brighton and Onondaga Valley Railroad, Genesee and Water Street Railroad and Syracuse and Geddes Railway. The rail ran a total distance of 24 miles (39 km) and had branches every 3 miles (4.8 km).[3] At that time, the Woodlawn and Butternut Street Railway ceased to exist.[1]

Syracuse Consolidated Street Railway filed for bankruptcy in 1893 and merged with the Syracuse Rapid Transit Railway Company in May 1896.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Bruce, Dwight Hall. Memorial history of Syracuse, N.Y., from its settlement to the present time. Electronic Library, 2011. Retrieved July 5, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d Poor, Henry Varnum. Manual of the railroads of the United States, Volume 22. Poors, 1889 p. 85; 317. Retrieved February 4, 2011. 
  3. ^ Poor, Henry Varnum. Manual of the railroads of the United States, Volume 27. Poors, 1889 p. 85; 317. Retrieved February 18, 2011. 
  4. ^ American street railway investments. The Street Railway Publishing Company, 1899 p. 262. Retrieved February 18, 2011.