Young Tarang

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Young Tarang
Young Tarang (Nazia and Zoheb album).jpg
Studio album by
Released1983 (Pakistan)
24 December 1984 (worldwide)
GenrePakistani pop, Indi-pop
LabelCBS
ProducerBiddu
Nazia and Zoheb chronology
Star/Boom Boom
(1982)
Young Tarang
(1983)
Hotline
(1987)

Young Tarang is the third studio album by the Pakistani pop duo Nazia and Zoheb, consisting of Nazia Hassan and Zoheb Hassan.[1][2][3] The music was composed by Zoheb and Indian producer Biddu, with lyrics written by Nazia and Zoheb.[4]

It was first released in Pakistan in 1983,[5] then worldwide in 1984,[3] and went on to sell over 40 million copies.[1][2] It is one of the most famous albums of Asia. It was also the first South Asian album to feature music videos.

Music video[edit]

Amit Khanna directed "Zara Chera Tu Dekhao", "Sunn" and "Dosti". He used three cameras to shoot the videos. After this the team went to London and recorded four videos with the famous set designer and director, John King, who was also the set designer of Michael Jackson's "Thriller". Amit and John worked on "Pyar Ka Jadu", "Dum Dum Dede", "Ankhien Milane Wale" and "Aag".

Reception[edit]

In 1983, EMI awarded it a Platinum disc for exceeding 150,000 cassette sales in Pakistan.[5] The album went on to become a success in India,[3] and in South East Asia, where it was awarded a Double Platinum Disc.[6] The Hong Kong magazine Asiaweek reported that the album sold 100,000 cassettes in its first three weeks, with demand remaining consistent afterwards.[7] The album went on to sell over 40 million copies worldwide.[1][2]

Songs[edit]

  1. Aag - Nazia Hassan
  2. Dum Dum Dede - Nazia Hassan
  3. Chehra - Zoheb Hassan
  4. Kya Howa - Nazia Hassan
  5. Dosti - Nazia Hassan & Zoheb Hassan
  6. Ashanti - Zoheb Hassan
  7. Sunn - Nazia Hassan
  8. Medley - Instrumental
  9. Ankhien Milane Wale - Nazia Hassan
  10. Pyar Ka Jadu - Zoheb Hassan

Music by[edit]

Lyrics by[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Young Tarang". Rediff. Retrieved 28 November 2017.
  2. ^ a b c Sheikh, M. A. (2012). Who’s Who: Music in Pakistan. Xlibris Corporation. p. 192. ISBN 9781469191591.[self-published source]
  3. ^ a b c Gopal, Sangita; Moorti, Sujata (2008). Global Bollywood: Travels of Hindi Song and Dance. University of Minnesota Press. p. 99. ISBN 9780816645787.
  4. ^ "Nazia Hassan & Zoheb Hassan – Young Tarang". Discogs. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Pakistan Hotel and Travel Review". Pakistan Hotel and Travel Review. Syed Wali Ahmad Maulai. 6–8: 45. 1983.
  6. ^ "Women Year Book of Pakistan". Women Year Book of Pakistan. Ladies Forum Publications. 8: 405. 1990.
  7. ^ "Asiaweek". Asiaweek. Asiaweek Limited. 11: 124. 1985.