Zürich Tram Museum

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Zürich Tram Museum
Tramdepot (Tram-Museum) Burgwies in Zürich-Burgwies 2013-06-13 14-02-54.JPG
Established1967 (1967)
LocationForchstrasse 260, 8008 Zürich, Switzerland
Coordinates47°21′27″N 8°34′18″E / 47.3576°N 8.5716°E / 47.3576; 8.5716Coordinates: 47°21′27″N 8°34′18″E / 47.3576°N 8.5716°E / 47.3576; 8.5716
TypeTransport museum
Public transit accessZürich tram route 11
Websitetram-museum.ch

The Zürich Tram Museum (German: Tram-Museum Zürich; TMZ) is a transport museum in the Swiss city of Zürich, specialising in the history of the Zürich tram system. The main museum site is located at the former tram depot, Tramdepot Burgwies. The museum also maintains a workshop at the much smaller former tram depot of Wartau.[1][2][3]

The tram museum is run by an association, the Verein Tram Museum Zürich, which has some 500 members, and is responsible for looking after the exhibits of the museum. The tram cars remain in the ownership of the Verkehrsbetriebe Zürich, the city-owned operator of the Zürich tram system.[4]

History[edit]

Preserved cars outside the Wartau site.

The Zürich Tram Museum was founded in 1967, and at first it used various borrowed locations to store and work on its exhibits. In 1989 it took over the tiny former Strassenbahn Zürich–Höngg [de] (StZH) tram depot at Wartau, which had been out of use as a tram depot since the 1923 acquisition of the StZH by the city, and opened its first public museum there. The new museum was just big enough to hold five preserved trams.[1][5][6]

In May 2007, the museum moved to the significantly larger former tram depot at Burgwies, although Wartau has been retained as a workshop and store. On 26 May 2007, twelve heritage trams each ran from a different Zürich terminus, converging into a parade along the Limmatquai. At the end of the parade, they ran to the new museum at Burgwies.[1]

On 21 May 2017, to celebrate both the fiftieth anniversary of the foundation of the tram museum, and the tenth anniversary of its move to Burgweis, another tram parade was held through the city centre. The parade comprised 18 tram cars from all epochs between 1885 and 2006 and was led by a horse-drawn replica of a Zürich horse tram that is normally kept at the Swiss Museum of Transport in Lucerne. Other trams came from the Zürich Tram Museum's preserved fleet, and from Verkehrsbetriebe Zürich's current operational fleet. The tram crews and passengers wore costumes appropriate to the era of the tram in which they travelled.[7][8]

Access[edit]

Tram 321+626 on museum route 21

The main museum site at Burgwies is open to the public on several days a week, with exact opening hours varying by day of the week and season of the year. The museum is located by the Bergweis tram stop, on tram route 11 at the boundary of the city's Weinegg and Hirslanden quarters. The museum also runs an occasional historic tram service between Burgwies and the city centre, billed as tram route 21. Route 21 operates on both days of the last weekend of each month, providing a half-hourly frequency in summer and an hourly frequency in winter, during museum opening hours.[2][9][10]

The site at Wartau is located on tram route 13 in the Höngg quarter, but is not normally open to the public.

Collection[edit]

Tram fleet[edit]

The museum's collection includes about 20 preserved tram cars, the majority of which are operational. In addition to cars from Zürich's city owned fleet, the collection includes cars from the private companies that operated routes around Zürich in the early days. Cars from the city fleet demonstrate changes in design over time, from cars very similar to these early private sector vehicles, through the 1930s Elefant bogie cars and 1940s Swiss Standard Tram [de; fr] cars, to trams recently retired.[1]

The preserved tram fleet of the museum includes the following vehicles:

Number Type Year Notes Image
1 Ce 2/2 1897 Two-axle motor tram originally built for the Strassenbahn Zürich-Oerlikon-Seebach [de] and preserved in their green livery. This is the oldest operable electric tram car in Switzerland.[11][12] Tramdepot (Tram-Museum) Burgwies in Zürich-Burgwies - 'Zürich-Oerlikon-Seebach' 2013-06-13 14-08-00.JPG
2 Ce 2/2 1900 Motor tram originally built for the Limmattal tramway and preserved in their yellow livery. Known as Lisbethli, after the popular name of its original line.[11][13] Tram-museum zuerich lisbeth.jpg
2 1907 Motor tram originally built for the Albisgütlibahn [de] and sold to the Bex–Villars–Bretaye Railway (BVB) in 1953. Numbered 8 by the BVB. Returned to Zürich for preservation in 2006.[14][15]
2 Ce 2/2 1928 Two axle motor tram built for the Städtische Strassenbahn Zürich (StStZ) of a class popularly known as schnelläufer (fast runner).[11] Zurich Tram Museum 2011 497.jpg
102 Ce 2/2 1900 Two-axle motor tram. The oldest extant vehicle built for the StStZ.[8] StStZ 102 at 2016-09-25 17.03.28.jpg
119 B 1935 Light rail trailer car originally from the Lausanne tramway, acquired by the Forchbahn in 1962 and preserved in the latter's red livery. Because of its origins, popularly known as lausanner.[11][16] Forchbahn B119.JPG
176 Ce 2/2 1909 Two-axle motor tram built for the StStZ. A later and updated version of the design seen in car 102, with a riveted frame and four larger windows in place of 102's five windows, this is the youngest car in the museum to retain longitudinal seating.[8][11][17] StStZ 176 2017-05-21 11.11.13.jpg
321 Ce 4/4 1930 Four-axle centre-entrance motor tram. One of a class of 50 similar vehicles popularly known by the name elefant (elephant). With a weight of 27 tonnes and four 80 hp motors, these cars were used to haul up to three two-axle trailers over Zürich's considerable gradients.[18] Zurich 2011 534a.jpg
455 C 1912 Tram trailer built for the StStZ.[8] StStZ 455 2017-05-21 11.11.13.jpg
626 C 1925 Tram trailer.[8] Zurich Tram Museum 2011 532.jpg
679 C 1930 Tram trailer.[8]
687 C 1931 Tram trailer.[11] Zurich Tram Museum 2011 501.jpg
732 C4 1949 Four-axle tram trailer for use with Swiss Standard trams.[8] Swiss Standard trams at Gessnerallee on museum route 21 crop.jpg
1392 Be 4/4 1950 Medium weight Swiss Standard tram, a four-axle motor tram of a type popularly known as Kurbeli.[8][19] Zurich Tram Museum 2011 526a.jpg
1430 Be 4/4 1960 Motor tram of a type popularly known as the P16 or Karpfen (carp). At the time it was built, there were plans to place Zürich's tram lines in tunnels called the Tiefbahn, and it was realised that the Swiss Standard trams were not seen as suitable for this, because the doors on their tapered car ends would not have aligned with the proposed station platforms. This car had its doors parallel to its sides, but it was found that it could not run on some existing routes, and only one batch of 15 motor tram and trailer pairs was built.[11][20] VBZ 1430 at 2016-09-25 15.35.56.jpg
1530 Be 4/4 1949 Light weight Swiss Standard tram, a four-axle motor tram of a type popularly known as Pedaler.[11] VBZ 1530 2017-05-21 08.49.00.jpg
1675 Be 4/6 1968 Six-axle, three section articulated tram of a type popularly known as Mirage. A development of the Karpfen design, but using articulation to overcome that design's limitations, the Mirage was originally intended to operate both on the surface and in the planned Tiefbahn tunnels, but the tunnels were cancelled in 1962.[8][20][21] VBZ 1675 2017-05-21 11.20.04 cropped.jpg
1905 Xe 2/2 1962 Depot shunter popularly known as laubfrosch (tree frog). Built in 1962 using parts from withdrawn trams, its open construction and single central controller was an efficient design for shunting trailer cars, used especially during peak periods.[11] Zurich Xe2 1905 2017-05-21 08.34.37.jpg
1935 Xe 2/2 1914 Motor works car popularly known as besenwagen (broom wagon).[11] Zurich Tram Museum 2011 519.jpg

Other exhibits[edit]

The Burgweis depot

The museum also includes a mezzanine level with smaller exhibits. These include a model tramway layout illustrating the city's street scene over the years, together with a selection of documents and photographs. The museum shop stocks a selection of books, postcards, models and souvenirs.[1][2]

The museum building, the former Tramdepot Burgwies, is also a significant exhibit in its own right, and is shared with a branch of the Migros supermarket chain. The building is inscribed on the Swiss Inventory of Cultural Property of National Significance.[22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Zürich celebrates its new tram museum". www.proactiva.ch. Archived from the original on 17 August 2016. Retrieved 10 September 2011.
  2. ^ a b c "Zürich Tram Museum". Zürich Tram Museum. Archived from the original on 17 August 2016. Retrieved 16 August 2016.
  3. ^ "Wartau open day, and farewell to 93". www.proactiva.ch. Archived from the original on 17 August 2016. Retrieved 10 September 2011.
  4. ^ "Zürich Tram Museum Club". Zürich Tram Museum. Archived from the original on 17 August 2016. Retrieved 16 August 2016.
  5. ^ "Die Strassenbahn Zürich - Höngg (Z-H), 1898 - 1924" (in German). Tram-Museum Zürich. 11 October 2003. Archived from the original on 1 September 2011. Retrieved 22 July 2015.
  6. ^ "Anniversary Programme". Tram-Museum Zürich. Archived from the original on 8 June 2017. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  7. ^ "Die grosse Zürcher Tram-Parade" [The great Zurich Tram Parade] (in German). Tages Anzeiger. 18 May 2017. Archived from the original on 18 May 2017. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Unique tram parade from the horse tram to the low floor articulated car, populated with passengers dressed according to the respective time periods" (PDF). Tram Museum Zürich. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2 May 2017. Retrieved 2 May 2017.
  9. ^ "OpenStreetMap @ 47.35804/8.57151". OpenStreetMap contributors. Archived from the original on 17 August 2016. Retrieved 17 March 2014.
  10. ^ "Museumslinie 21 - Fahrplan" [Museum line 21 - The Timetable] (PDF) (in German). Zürich Tram Museum. Archived (PDF) from the original on 17 August 2016. Retrieved 17 August 2016.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Information displayed on car in museum (in German). Tram-Museum Zürich. Retrieved 2011-09-24.
  12. ^ "ZOS Ce 2/2 1" (in German). Tram-Museum Zürich. Archived from the original on 30 June 2010. Retrieved 11 November 2011.
  13. ^ "LSB Ce 2/2 2" (in German). Tram-Museum Zürich. Archived from the original on 2 June 2010. Retrieved 11 November 2011.
  14. ^ "News roundup". www.proaktiva.ch. Archived from the original on 17 August 2016. Retrieved 5 February 2012.
  15. ^ "Former Albisgüetli tram in Kärnten". www.proaktiva.ch. Archived from the original on 17 August 2016. Retrieved 5 February 2012.
  16. ^ "Anhängewagen B 119" [Trailer car B 119] (in German). Verein zur förderung historischer Forchbahnfahrzeuge. Archived from the original on 27 September 2013. Retrieved 19 September 2013.
  17. ^ "Ce 2/2 176" (in German). Tram-Museum Zürich. Archived from the original on 2 June 2010. Retrieved 11 November 2011.
  18. ^ "Ce 4/4 321" (in German). Tram-Museum Zürich. Archived from the original on 21 May 2006. Retrieved 11 November 2011.
  19. ^ "Photo tour with Kurbeli on 22nd April". www.proaktiva.ch. Archived from the original on 17 August 2016. Retrieved 11 November 2011.
  20. ^ a b Moglestue, Andrew (December 2005). "Zürich: A city and its trams: Chapter 2: Threats and survival". Archived from the original on 1 August 2017. Retrieved 1 August 2017.
  21. ^ "Mirages for tram museum". www.proactiva.ch. Archived from the original on 3 October 2016. Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  22. ^ "Schweizerisches Inventar der Kulturgüter von nationaler Bedeutung - Zürich" [Swiss Inventory of Cultural Property of National Significance - Zürich] (PDF) (in German). Swiss Confederation. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 August 2011. Retrieved 13 September 2011.

External links[edit]