Zenodotus (philosopher)

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This article is about the Neoplatonist philosopher. For the Stoic philosopher, see Zenodotus (Stoic). For the grammarian, see Zenodotus.

Zenodotus (/zəˈnɒdətəs/; Greek: Ζηνόδοτος; fl. late 5th century) was a Neoplatonist philosopher who lived and taught in Athens. He was described as "the darling (paidika) of Proclus."[1] Zenodotus served under Marinus of Neapolis when Marinus succeeded Proclus as the head (scholarch) of the school (c. 485). He was a teacher of Damascius when he came to Athens to learn philosophy (c. 492). Whereas Marinus taught mathematics and scientific courses to Damascius, Zenodotus taught the more conventional philosophy courses.[2] He was an important philosopher in Athens during the time when Marinus and Hegias were contending for the leadership of the school, but he seems to have been overlooked as a possible scholarch on more than one occasion.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Damascius, Life of Isidore, fr. 154 Zintzen
  2. ^ Photius, Bibl. cod. 181

References[edit]

  • Edward Jay Watts (2006), City and School in Late Antique Athens and Alexandria. University of California Press. pp. 116–123.