2013 IIHF Women's World Championship

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2013 IIHF Women's World Championship
Tournament details
Host country  Canada
Dates 2–9 April 2013
Teams 8
Venue(s) (in 1 host city)
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg  United States (5th title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg  Canada
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg  Russia
Fourth place  Finland
Tournament statistics
Matches played 21
Goals scored 109 (5.19 per match)
Attendance 97,156 (4,626 per match)
Scoring leader(s) Canada Marie-Philip Poulin
(12 points)
MVP Canada Marie-Philip Poulin
2012

The 2013 IIHF World Women's Championships was the 15th world championship sanctioned by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) and was the last world championship before the 2014 Winter Olympics. Canada faced the United States for the gold medal for the 15th consecutive tournament; The Americans won their fifth world title with a 3–2 win,[1] while Russia defeated Finland, 2–0, to win its second bronze medal in tournament history.[2]

The tournament was held at Ottawa, Canada, the site of the first Women's World Championship in 1990. Organizers set a tournament record of over 150,000 tickets sold, and a preliminary round contest between Canada and Finland set an all-time attendance mark for a women's hockey game of 18,013. Canada's Marie-Philip Poulin was named top forward and most valuable player after leading the tournament with 12 points. Finland's Jenni Hiirikoski was named top defenceman and Russia's Nadezhda Alexandrova was named top goaltender.

Top Division[edit]

The Top Division of the world championship was contested between eight teams from April 2 to April 9, 2013 in Ottawa, Canada. It was the second time the tournament was held in Canada's capital city as Ottawa hosted the inaugural Women's World Championship in 1990. The women's game had undergone a considerable period of growth in the intervening 23 years; the 1990 tournament was primarily played in small community arenas, but the majority of the 2013 event was held in the 20,000 seat Scotiabank Place arena.[3]

The host city set a tournament record by selling over 150,000 tickets for the tournament, but gate attendance fell short of the record of 119,231 set in 2007. Such discrepancies are not ususual at IIHF events, where games are often sold in packages in order to boost attendance figures of less attractive fixtures.[4] However, both actual attendance and ticket sales were below the ambitious pre-tournament objective of 200,000 spectators relayed to the media by the organizers.[3]

According to Hockey Canada, the announced crowd of 18,013 for the preliminary round game between Canada and Finland set an all-time record for a women's hockey game. A large component of the crowd was made up of female players competing in the Ontario Women’s Hockey Association provincial championships, which was scheduled to coincide with the Women's World Championship. The game surpassed the previous record of 16,347, also set in Ottawa, for a pre-Olympic exhibition game in 2010.[5]

Overnight data indicates that an average 795,000 viewers watched the Gold Medal game in Canada, making it the highest rated Women's World Championship final in TSN's history.[6]

Teams[edit]

The preliminary round was divided into two pools and introduced a new format that placed the top four seeds into Group A, and the bottom four in Group B. The top two finishers in Group A advanced directly to the semifinals, while the two remaining teams and the top two in Group B played a quarterfinal round.[7] The change in format helped reduce the number of severely one-sided contests in a tournament praised by IIHF president René Fasel for its increasing competitiveness.[8]

Each teams roster for the 2013 IIHF Women's World Championship consists of at least 15 skaters (forwards, and defencemen) and 2 goaltenders, and at most 20 skaters and 3 goaltenders. All eight participating nations, through the confirmation of their respective national associations, had to submit a roster by the first IIHF directorate.

Officials[edit]

The IIHF selected six referees and nine linesmen to work the 2013 IIHF Women's World Championship. They were the following:[9]

Tournament highlights[edit]

The opening night featured a match-up of the game's top powers, Canada and the United States. The contest ended with a 3–2 Canadian win, decided by a shootout, in what was viewed as a preview of the probable gold medal final.[10] The Canadian team made headlines by wearing yellow and black uniforms in lieu of the team's usual red and white colors. This was part of a promotion for the Nike-backed Livestrong cancer awareness initiative, whose founder Lance Armstrong had confessed to doping a few months earlier. Nike hoped to attach the Livestrong brand to other athletes, and the jerseys were subsequently auctioned in support of the charity.[11] Both teams easily won their remaining pool games,[12] to earn byes to the semifinals.[5]

After failing to win a game in the 2012 tournament,[7] Russia rebounded in 2013 by winning all of its pool games to lead Group B. It clinched first place with a 4–0 victory over Sweden, a nation that entered the tournament with high medal hopes but was instead forced to play a best-of-three series against the Czech Republic to avoid relegation.[13] The Swedes, who will host the next tournament in 2015, retained their position in the top division by winning the series against the Czechs by 2–1 (SO) and 4–0 scores.[14] The Czech Republic, who were promoted from Division 1A for this tournament, were relegated back to the lower division.[15]

In the medal round, Germany joined Russia in reaching the quarterfinal round from Group B, while Finland and Switzerland qualified out of Group A.[12] The Russians won their fourth consecutive game in the tournament by defeating the 2012 bronze medal-winning Switzerland team 2–1 to earn a semifinal game against Canada. Forty-year-old Yekaterina Pashkevich, the eldest player in the tournament, said that her nation's turnaround following a winless 2012 tournament could be attributed to increased "drive and motivation" in the country as a result of Russia hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics.[16] In the second semifinal, Finland beat Germany 1–0 to earn a match-up with the United States. Goaltender Meeri Raisanen recorded the shutout after unexpectedly being named her team's starter in favour of Finland's number-one goaltender, Noora Raty.[17]

Russia's unbeaten run came to an end in the semifinals as they were routed by Canada, 8–1.[18] In a closer contest, the United States defeated Finland, 3–0.[19] The results set up the 15th consecutive gold medal match-up between the two North American rivals.[18]

In the bronze medal game, the Russians captured only their second medal in tournament history with a 2–0 victory over Finland. They earned the win on the goaltending of Nadezhda Alexandrova, who stopped all 32 shots she faced for the shutout.[20]

The United States defeated Canada, 3–2 to win its fifth world championship in seven years. The winning goal was scored by Amanda Kessel for the American team that outshot their opponents 30–16.[21] The goaltending of Shannon Szabados was credited with keeping Canada close as Americans used their speed advantage to overcome Canada's size and physical presence.[22]

Preliminary round[edit]

Legend
Advanced to the Semifinals
Advanced to the Quarterfinals
Played in the Relegation Round

Group A[edit]

Team GP W OTW OTL L GF GA DIF PTS
 Canada 3 2 1 0 0 24 2 +22 8
 United States 3 2 0 1 0 11 5 +6 7
 Finland 3 1 0 0 2 4 13 −9 3
  Switzerland 3 0 0 0 3 1 20 −19 0

All times are local (UTC−4).

2 April 2013
15:30
Finland  2–1
(0–1, 2–0, 0–0)
  Switzerland Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 3,366
2 April 2013
19:30
Canada  3–2 GWS
(0–2, 0–0, 2–0)
(OT: 0–0)
(SO: 1–0)
 United States Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 11,174
3 April 2013
15:30
United States  4–2
(4–1, 0–1, 0–0)
 Finland Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 3,113
3 April 2013
19:30
Switzerland   0–13
(0–2, 0–6, 0–5)
 Canada Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 9,904
5 April 2013
15:30
United States  5–0
(2–0, 1–0, 2–0)
  Switzerland Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 5,626
5 April 2013
19:30
Canada  8–0
(3–0, 1–0, 4–0)
 Finland Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 18,014

Group B[edit]

Team GP W OTW OTL L GF GA DIF PTS
 Russia 3 3 0 0 0 11 1 +10 9
 Germany 3 1 0 1 1 8 10 −2 4
 Czech Republic 3 1 0 0 2 7 11 −4 3
 Sweden 3 0 1 0 2 5 9 −4 2

All times are local (UTC−4).

2 April 2013
12:00
Russia  4–0
(1–0, 0–0, 3–0)
 Germany Nepean Sportsplex, Ottawa
Attendance: 409
2 April 2013
16:00
Sweden  2–3
(0–2, 2–1, 0–0)
 Czech Republic Nepean Sportsplex, Ottawa
Attendance: 186
3 April 2013
12:00
Russia  3–1
(1–0, 1–1, 1–0)
 Czech Republic Nepean Sportsplex, Ottawa
Attendance: 1,045
3 April 2013
16:00
Germany  2–3 OT
(2–1, 0–0, 0–1)
(OT 0–1)
 Sweden Nepean Sportsplex, Ottawa
Attendance: 291
5 April 2013
12:00
Czech Republic  3–6
(1–1, 0–3, 2–2)
 Germany Nepean Sportsplex, Ottawa
Attendance: 1,234
5 April 2013
16:00
Sweden  0–4
(0–1, 0–2, 0–1)
 Russia Nepean Sportsplex, Ottawa
Attendance: 635

Relegation series[edit]

Best of three.

All times are local (UTC−4).

6 April 2013
16:00
Czech Republic  1–2 GWS
(0–1, 0–0, 1–0)
(OT 0–0)
(SO: 0–1)
 Sweden Nepean Sportsplex, Ottawa
Attendance: 667
8 April 2013
12:00
Sweden  4–0
(0–0, 2–0, 2–0)
 Czech Republic Nepean Sportsplex, Ottawa
Attendance: 604

Final round[edit]

  Quarterfinals     Semifinals     Final
                           
      A1   Canada 8  
  A4    Switzerland 1     B1   Russia 1    
  B1   Russia 2         A1   Canada 2
      A2   United States 3
      A2   United States 3    
  A3   Finland 1     A3   Finland 0   Third place
  B2   Germany 0   B1   Russia 2
  A3   Finland 0

Quarterfinals[edit]

6 April 2013
15:30
Finland  1–0
(1–0, 0–0, 0–0)
 Germany Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 5,406
6 April 2013
19:30
Switzerland   1–2
(0–1, 1–0, 0–1)
 Russia Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 5,839

Semifinals[edit]

8 April 2013
15:30
United States  3–0
(0–0, 0–0, 3–0)
 Finland Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 4,035
8 April 2013
19:30
Canada  8–1
(1–0, 5–1, 2–0)
 Russia Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 7,255

Fifth place game[edit]

8 April 2013
11:30
Switzerland   3–5
(1–1, 0–3, 2–1)
 Germany Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 4,008

Bronze medal game[edit]

9 April 2013
15:30
Russia  2–0
(0–0, 0–0, 2–0)
 Finland Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 5,618

Gold medal game[edit]

9 April 2013
19:30
Canada  2–3
(1–0, 1–2, 0–1)
 United States Scotiabank Place, Ottawa
Attendance: 13,776

Ranking and statistics[edit]

Final standings[edit]

Gold medal icon.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg  Canada
Bronze medal icon.svg  Russia
4  Finland
5  Germany
6   Switzerland
7  Sweden
8  Czech Republic
 Relegated to Division I A 

Scoring leaders[edit]

List shows the top 10 skaters sorted by points, then goals.

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM
Canada Marie-Philip Poulin 5 6 6 12 +12 2
United States Brianna Decker 5 6 2 8 +8 4
Canada Jenn Wakefield 5 4 4 8 +5 2
United States Amanda Kessel 5 2 6 8 +6 0
Canada Sarah Vaillancourt 5 2 5 7 +8 2
Canada Catherine Ward 5 1 6 7 +7 18
Canada Meghan Agosta-Marciano 5 4 2 6 +7 0
Canada Brianne Jenner 5 4 2 6 +6 2
Canada Jayna Hefford 5 2 4 6 +11 2
Canada Haley Irwin 5 2 4 6 +8 2

GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; +/− = Plus/Minus; PIM = Penalties In Minutes

Source: IIHF.COM

Leading goaltenders[edit]

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played 40% of their team's minutes are included in this list.

Player TOI SA GA GAA Sv% SO
Russia Nadezhda Alexandrova 209:44 73 1 0.29 98.63 2
Sweden Sara Grahn 211:06 67 3 0.85 95.52 1
Germany Jennifer Harß 120:53 76 4 1.99 94.74 0
Canada Shannon Szabados 243:35 93 6 1.48 93.55 1
Switzerland Florence Schelling 237:51 159 13 3.28 91.82 0

TOI = Time On Ice (minutes:seconds); SA = Shots Against; GA = Goals Against; GAA = Goals Against Average; Sv% = Save Percentage; SO = Shutouts

Source: IIHF.com

Tournament Awards[edit]

Division I[edit]

The Division I competition was being held in two groups. Group A games were played from April 7 to April 13, 2013, in Stavanger, Norway,[24] and Group B was being played from April 8 to April 14, 2013 in Strasbourg or Rouen, France.[25]

Division II[edit]

The Division II competition was held in two groups. Group A games were played from April 8 to April 14, 2013 in Auckland, New Zealand,[26] and Group B was played in Puigcerdà, Spain.[27] An additional qualification group was won by Turkey in December, 2012 in Izmir, Turkey.[28]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "U.S. reclaims gold". iihf.com. 2013-04-10. 
  2. ^ "Russians take bronze". iihf.com. 2013-04-10. 
  3. ^ a b Podnieks, Andrew (2013-03-28). "Ottawa set for record WW". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  4. ^ Holder, Gord (2013-04-09). "IIHF council member says another women’s hockey power must emerge for good of the game". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  5. ^ a b Kallan, Chris (2013-04-05). "Finland 0 - Canada 8". Hockey Canada. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  6. ^ TSN Staff (2013-04-11). "TSN scores record audience for women's gold medal game". Bell Media Television. Retrieved 2013-04-13. 
  7. ^ a b Spencer, Donna (2013-03-31). "Canada preparing to defend women's world hockey championship gold". Winnipeg Free Press. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  8. ^ Spencer, Donna (2013-04-09). "IIHF president Rene Fasel says women’s hockey is in a good place". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  9. ^ "Referee assignments". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2013-03-26. 
  10. ^ Helmer, Aedan (2013-04-02). "Team Canada beats Team USA 3-2 in shootout at Scotiabank Place". Ottawa Sun. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  11. ^ Spencer, Donna (2013-04-01). "Canadian women to open world hockey championship in Livestrong colours". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2013-04-10. 
  12. ^ a b "Game results". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  13. ^ Staffieri, Mark (2013-04-06). "Sweden forced to relegation". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  14. ^ Podnieks, Andrew (2013-04-08). "Sweden up, Czechs down". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  15. ^ Taylor-Baptiste, Stephanie (2013-04-08). "Sweden avoids relegation while Germany takes fifth place". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 2013-04-10. 
  16. ^ Podnieks, Andrew (2013-04-07). "Russians off to semis". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  17. ^ Podnieks, Andrew (2013-04-07). "Finland off to semis". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  18. ^ a b Holder, Gord (2013-04-08). "Canada shrugs off Russia to set up another gold medal showdown in women’s world hockey". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  19. ^ "U.S. women beat Finland for shot at gold". USA Today. 2013-04-08. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  20. ^ "Russia claims women's hockey bronze over Finland". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 2013-04-09. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  21. ^ "USA beats Canada to win Women's World Hockey Championship". The Sports Network. 2013-04-09. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  22. ^ Scanlan, Wayne (2013-04-09). "Canada should look to upgrade speed". Postmedia News. Retrieved 2013-04-10. 
  23. ^ "Poulin named MVP". worldwomen2013.com. 2013-04-10. 
  24. ^ "2013 IIHF ice hockey women's world championship Div. 1 Group A". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  25. ^ "2013 IIHF ice hockey women's world championship Div. 1 Group B". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  26. ^ "2013 IIHF ice hockey women's world championship Div. II Group A". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  27. ^ "2013 IIHF ice hockey women's world championship Div. II Group B". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  28. ^ "2013 IIHF ice hockey women's world championship Div. II Group B Qual.". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 

External links[edit]