24 Aquarii

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24 Aquarii
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Aquarius
Right ascension 21h 39m 31.52640s[1]
Declination −00° 03′ 04.0268″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 6.65[2]
Characteristics
Spectral type F7 III[3]
B−V color index +0.52[4]
Astrometry
Proper motion (μ) RA: +232.76[1] mas/yr
Dec.: +8.81[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 22.74 ± 0.81[1] mas
Distance 143 ± 5 ly
(44 ± 2 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 3.43[2]
Orbit[5]
Period (P) 48.65 yr
Semi-major axis (a) 0.448"
Eccentricity (e) 0.868
Inclination (i) 58.0°
Longitude of the node (Ω) 139.3°
Periastron epoch (T) 1971.55
Argument of periastron (ω)
(secondary)
293.0°
Details
Temperature 6,223[2] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] –0.11[2] dex
Age 3.1[2] Gyr
Other designations
BD-00 4245, HD 206058, HIP 106942, LTT 8626, SAO 145566.
Data sources:
Hipparcos Catalogue,
CCDM (2002),
Bright Star Catalogue (5th rev. ed.)

24 Aquarii is the Flamsteed designation for a double star in the equatorial constellation of Aquarius. The apparent magnitude of this system is 6.65,[2] which, according to the Bortle Dark-Sky Scale, means it is a faint star that is just visible to the naked eye from dark, rural skies. It has an annual parallax shift of 22.74 milliarcseconds,[1] which is equivalent to a distance of 143 light-years (44 parsecs) from Earth. The system has a stellar classification of F7 III,[3] suggesting it contains an evolved giant star.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f van Leeuwen, F. (November 2007), "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction", Astronomy and Astrophysics 474 (2): 653–664, arXiv:0708.1752, Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Nordström, B. et al. (May 2004), "The Geneva-Copenhagen survey of the Solar neighbourhood. Ages, metallicities, and kinematic properties of ˜14 000 F and G dwarfs", Astronomy and Astrophysics 418: 989–1019, arXiv:astro-ph/0405198, Bibcode:2004A&A...418..989N, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20035959. 
  3. ^ a b Fehrenbach, C. (1966), "La mesure des vitesses radiales au prisme objectif XIX. Liste de 893 vitesses radiales determinees au prisme objectif a vision directe", Publications de l'Observatoire de Haute-Provence 8, Bibcode:1966POHP....8...25F. 
  4. ^ Cousins, A. W. J.; Stoy, R. H. (1962), "Photoelectric magnitudes and colours of Southern stars.", Royal Observatory Bulletin 64, Bibcode:1962RGOB...64..103C. 
  5. ^ Branham, Richard L., Jr. (March 2005), "Calculating the Apparent Orbit of a Double Star", The Astrophysical Journal 622 (1): 613–61, Bibcode:2005ApJ...622..613B, doi:10.1086/427870. 

External links[edit]