Acokanthera schimperi

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Acokanthera schimperi
Acokanthera schimperi - Köhler–s Medizinal-Pflanzen-150.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Gentianales
Family: Apocynaceae
Genus: Acokanthera
Species: A. schimperi
Binomial name
Acokanthera schimperi
(A.DC.) Schweinf.
Synonyms[1]
  • Acokanthera abyssinica K.Schum. nom. illeg.
  • Acokanthera deflersii Schweinf. ex Lewin
  • Acokanthera friesiorum Markgr.
  • Acokanthera ouabaio Cathelineau ex Lewin
  • Acokanthera schimperi (A. DC.) Benth. & Hook. f.
  • Arduina schimperi (A.DC.) Baill.
  • Carissa deflersii (Schweinf. ex Lewin) Pichon
  • Carissa friesiorum (Markgr.) Cufod.
  • Carissa inepta Perrot & Vogt
  • Carissa schimperi A.DC.

Acokanthera schimperi, belonging to the family Apocynaceae, is a small tree native to East Africa and Yemen.

Uses[edit]

The bark, wood and roots of Acokanthera schimperi are used as an important ingredient of arrow poison in Africa. All plant parts contain acovenoside A and ouabaïne, which are cardiotonic glycosides. Its fruit is edible, and is eaten as a famine food. When ripe they are sweet but also slightly bitter. Unripe fruits have caused accidental poisoning as they are highly toxic.[2]

The maned rat spreads the plant's poison on its fur and becomes poisonous.[3]

It is also used in traditional African medicine.[4]

Geographic distribution[edit]

Acokanthera schimperi occurs in Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda and DR Congo. It is the only species that also occurs outside Africa, in southern Yemen.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Plant List: A Working List of All Plant Species". 
  2. ^ Schmelzer, G.H. & Gurib-Fakim, A. (Editors), 2008. Plant Resources of Tropical Africa 11(1). Medicinal plants 1. PROTA Foundation, Wageningen, Netherlands / Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, Netherlands / CTA, Wageningen, Netherlands. 791 pp.
  3. ^ African crested rat uses poison trick to foil predators
  4. ^ http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16233967
  5. ^ African Plant Database

External links[edit]