Alan Hull

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Alan Hull
AlanHull1991.jpg
Alan Hull on stage with Lindisfarne in 1991
Background information
Birth name James Alan Hull
Born (1945-02-20)20 February 1945
Benwell, Newcastle upon Tyne, England
Died 17 November 1995(1995-11-17) (aged 50)
Genres Folk rock
Instruments Vocals, rhythm guitar, keyboards
Years active Mid 1960s–1995
Associated acts Lindisfarne
The Chosen Few
Skip Bifferty

James Alan Hull (20 February 1945 – 17 November 1995)[1] was an English singer-songwriter and founding member of the Tyneside folk rock band Lindisfarne.

Career[edit]

Hull was born in Benwell, Newcastle upon Tyne in 1945. He became a member of the band The Chosen Few alongside keyboard player Mick Gallagher in 1962. He supported himself one year by working as a nurse at a mental hospital and as a driver for Newcastle Co-op TV Dept. while appearing as a folk singer and guitarist in local clubs before helping to form Brethren and Downtown Faction, which evolved into Lindisfarne in 1970. He also released a one-off solo single, "We Can Swing Together", which was re-recorded with the group on their first album, Nicely Out of Tune, and became a regular favourite in their stage performances.[2]

As the group's most prolific songwriter and joint lead vocalist, Hull came to be regarded as its leader. In 1972, dissatisfied with the sound and critical reception of their third album Dingly Dell, he considered leaving the group but instead he and joint lead vocalist Ray "Jacka" Jackson formed a new six-piece Lindisfarne the following year, leaving the three other original members to form Jack The Lad. He also released a first solo album Pipedream the same year and published a book of poems, Mocking Horse.[2] Alan Hull appeared in "Squire" an episode of the BBC's Second City Firsts drama series.

Lindisfarne disbanded in 1975 and Hull released a second solo album Squire, then formed the short-lived Radiator, which also included drummer Ray Laidlaw of Lindisfarne and Jack the Lad. At the end of 1977 the original line-up of Lindisfarne reformed after a well-received Christmas show at the Newcastle City Hall which was broadcast on local radio. Thereafter he combined his musical career as front man of the group with a solo career. He was also a staunch Labour Party activist.[2]

In 1994, he recorded Back to Basics, a live all-acoustic survey of the best of his songwriting from 1970 onwards. On 17 November 1995 whilst working on a new album, Statues & Liberties, Hull died suddenly of a heart thrombosis, at the age of 50.[2]On 19 July 2012, following a public campaign led by Barry McKay, Lindisfarne's manager during the 1970s, an Alan Hull memorial plaque was unveiled on the front of Newcastle City Hall, at a ceremony attended by hundreds of fans and broadcast by filmed by Sky and ITV Tyne Tees.[3]

Solo discography[edit]

Singles[edit]

  • "We Can Swing Together" / "Obadiah's Grave" (1970)
  • "Numbers" / "Drinking Song" / "One Off Pat" (1973)
  • "Justanothersadsong" / "Waiting" (1973)
  • "Dan The Plan" / "One More Bottle of Wine" (1975)
  • "One More Bottle of Wine" / "Squire" (1975)
  • "Crazy Woman" / "Golden Oldies" (1975)
  • "I Wish You Well" / "Love Is The Answer" (1979)
  • "A Walk in the Sea" / "Corporation Rock" (1979)
  • "Malvinas Melody" / "Ode to a Taxman" (1983)

Albums[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 262. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 
  2. ^ a b c d OBITUARY: Alan Hull – People, News – The Independent
  3. ^ "Lindisfarne Founder'S Memory Honoured at City Hall. – Free Online Library". Thefreelibrary.com. Retrieved 12 December 2012. 

External links[edit]