Albert Sterner

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Albert Sterner (1863 – December 16, 1946) was an American illustrator and painter.

Career[edit]

Sterner painting war posters in 1918

Sterner was born in London, and attended King Edward's School, Birmingham. After a brief period in Germany, he eventually moved to the United States in 1879 to join his family who had previously moved to Chicago. He soon began doing lithography, painting, and illustrations. He opened a studio in New York in 1885 and began doing illustrations for magazines including Harper's Magazine, Scribner's Magazine, The Century Magazine, and Collier's. In 1888 he became a student at Académie Julian in Paris. He returned to the United States in 1918.[1][2]

Nude, circa 1916

In 1918 he returned to America and began teaching at the Art Students League in New York.[1][3][4]

Institutions that have exhibited his work include the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Carnegie Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago.[1]

Sterner's awards include the Carnegie Prize at the National Academy of Design in 1941.[1]

His New York Times obituary stated that he was perhaps best known for his portraits, but "he was also noted for his nudes, religious subjects, landscapes, still-life work and, in his earlier days, his book and magazine illustrations."[5]

Students[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Singular Impressions: Albert Sterner". Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 23 October 2012. 
  2. ^ "Artist Biography: Albert Sterner". Spanierman Gallery LLC. Retrieved 23 October 2012. 
  3. ^ "Instructors and Lecturers - Past and Present". Art Students League. Retrieved 19 May 2013. 
  4. ^ "Celebrating the Line". Art Students League. Retrieved 19 May 2013. 
  5. ^ "Albert Sterner, Noted Artist, 83; Portraitist, Lecturer, Teacher of Art Is Dead--Won Many Awards at Exhibitions Contributor to Magazines Wrote on Art Subjects". New York Times. 17 December 1946. 

References[edit]

  • Flint, Ralph. Albert Sterner: his life and his art (1927)

External links[edit]