Aldegonde

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Saint Aldegonde, O.S.B.
Hautmont Aldegonde de Maubeuge.JPG
A statue of Saint Aldegonde in Hautmont, Nord, France
Virgin and abbess
Born 639
Guînes, County of Hainaut
Died 684
Abbey of Maubeuge,
County of Hainaut
Honored in
Roman Catholic Church
(France)
Major shrine Abbey of Maubeuge,
Maubeuge, Nord, France
Feast January 30
Patronage Breast cancer, wounds

Saint Aldegonde (or Adelgonde) (Latin: Aldegundis or Adelgundis) (ca. 639–684) was a Frankish Benedictine abbess who is honored as a saint by the Catholic Church in France. She was closely related to the Merovingian royal family. Her parents, afterwards honored as St. Walbert, Count of Guînes, and St. Bertilla de Mareuil, lived in the County of Hainaut. She is the most famous of what Aline Hornaday calls the "Maubeuge Cycle" of Merovingian saints.[1]

Aldegundis was urged to marry, but she chose the life of the cloister. Having allegedly walked across the waters of the Sambre, she had built on its banks a small hospital at Malbode, which later became, under the name Maubeuge Abbey, a famous monastery. Initially a double monastery, it later developed into one solely of nuns. She bore with fortitude the breast cancer that eventually killed her.[2] Saint Aldegundis' Catholic liturgical feast is kept on January 30.

She has been supposed to be the sister of Saint Waltrude (Waudru).[3][4]

There are several early Lives, but none by contemporaries. Several of these, including the tenth-century biography by Hucbald, are printed by the Bollandists (Acta SS., January 11, 1034–35).

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Aline Hornaday, "Toward a Prosopography of the "Maubeuge Cycle" Saints", Prosopon Newsletter, 1996 on-line text.
  2. ^ Butler's Lives of the Saints, 1864.
  3. ^ article in Archéologie (March 2003), n° 398, p. 7
  4. ^ Saint of the Day, January 30: Aldegundis of Maubeuge SaintPatrickDC.org. Retrieved 2012-03-06.

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company.