Alfresco (software)

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Alfresco (software)
Alfresco Logo
Share and Repository Browser (Alfresco Community Edition).jpg
Alfresco Share / Repository Browser
(Community Edition)
Developer(s) Alfresco Software, Inc.
Initial release November 2005 (2005-11)
Stable release Community Edition 5.0.a[1] / June 27, 2014 (2014-06-27)
Written in Java, JSP and JavaScript
Operating system Cross-platform
Type ECM
License Enterprise Edition is proprietary; Community Edition is LGPL v3[2]
Website www.alfresco.com

Alfresco is a free/libre enterprise content management system for Microsoft Windows and Unix-like operating systems. Alfresco comes in three flavors:

  • Alfresco Community Edition is free software, LGPL[2] licensed open source and open standards. It has some important limitations in terms of scalability and availability, since the clustering feature has been removed from the community repository and is only available in the enterprise edition.[3]
  • Alfresco Enterprise Edition is commercially & proprietary licensed open source, open standards and enterprise scale. Its design is geared towards users who require a high degree of modularity and scalable performance.
  • Alfresco Cloud Edition (Alfresco in the cloud) is the SaaS version of Alfresco.

Alfresco includes a content repository, an out-of-the-box, web-based user interface for managing and using standard portal content, a CIFS interface that provides file system compatibility on Microsoft Windows and Unix-like operating systems, Lucene and Solr indexing, and Activiti workflow. The Alfresco system is developed using Java technology.

History[edit]

John Newton (co-founder of Documentum) and John Powell (a former COO of Business Objects) founded Alfresco Software, Inc. in 2005. Its investors include the investment firms SAP Ventures, Accel Partners and Mayfield Fund. The original technical staff consisted of principal engineers from Documentum and from Oracle.

While Alfresco's product initially focused on document management, in May, 2006, the company announced its intention to expand into web content management by acquiring senior technical and managerial staff from Interwoven; this included its VP of Web Content Management, two principal engineers, and a member of its user-interface team.[4] In 2007, Alfresco hired the principal sales engineer from Vignette.[citation needed]

In October, 2009, the 2009 Open Source CMS Market Share Report described Alfresco as a leading Java-based open source web content management system.[5]

In 2010, Alfresco sponsored a new open-source BPM engine called Activiti.

In July 2011, Alfresco and Ephesoft announced a technology partnership to offer their users document capture and Content Management Interoperability Services brought together for intelligent PDF capture and search and workflow development.[6]

In January 2012, Alfresco 4.0 was released with significant improvements over the user interface. The new Alfresco aims to move further features from Alfresco Explorer to Alfresco Share, as Alfresco Explorer is intended to be deprecated over time.

In January 2013, Alfresco appointed Doug Dennerline, former President of SuccessFactors, former EVP of Sales at Salesforce.com, and former CEO of WebEx, as its new CEO.

Usage[edit]

Enterprise content management for documents, web, records, images, and collaborative content development.

Features[edit]

Alfresco is capable of the following:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Download and Install Alfresco". Alfresco Wiki. Alfresco Software, Inc. Retrieved June 27, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Open Source Licensing". Alfresco Wiki. Alfresco Software, Inc. Retrieved February 25, 2014. 
  3. ^ Potts, Jeff (October 17, 2012). "What’s going on with Alfresco clustering?". ECM Architect Blog. Retrieved February 25, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Top Web Content Management Team Joins Alfresco Software". Press Release. Alfresco Software, Inc. May 22, 2006. Retrieved February 25, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Alfresco". Open Source CMS Market Share Report 2009. Simpler Media Group, Inc. p. 62. Retrieved February 25, 2014. (registration required)
  6. ^ Roe, David (July 8, 2011). "Alfresco, Ephesoft Partnership Offers CMIS-based Open Source Capture-to-Workflow Technology". CMSWire. Simpler Media Group, Inc. Retrieved February 25, 2014. 
  7. ^ Kim, Chunho (January 4, 2010). "Powerful Alfresco search engine and searching Alfresco documents directly from your browser". Appnovation Technologies. Retrieved February 25, 2014. 

See also[edit]

External links[edit]