Appalachian School of Law shooting

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Coordinates: 37°16′36″N 82°05′42″W / 37.27676°N 82.095038°W / 37.27676; -82.095038

Appalachian School of Law shooting
Location Grundy, Virginia, United States
Date January 16, 2002
1 p.m. (EST)
Target Faculty members and students at the Appalachian School of Law
Attack type
School shooting, murder
Weapon(s) .380 ACP semi-automatic handgun
Deaths 3
Non-fatal injuries
3
Perpetrator Peter Odighizuwa

The Appalachian School of Law shooting was a school shooting that occurred on January 16, 2002, at the Appalachian School of Law, an American Bar Association accredited private law school in Grundy, Virginia, United States. Three people were killed and three others were wounded when a former student, 43-year-old Nigerian immigrant Peter Odighizuwa, opened fire in the school with a handgun.

The shooting[edit]

On January 16, 2002, 43-year-old Nigerian former student Peter Odighizuwa[1][2] arrived on the Appalachian School of Law campus with a handgun.[3] Odighizuwa first discussed his academic problems with professor Dale Rubin, where he reportedly told Rubin to pray for him.[3] Odighizuwa returned to the school around 1 p.m. and proceeded to the offices of Dean Anthony Sutin and Professor Thomas Blackwell, where he opened fire with a .380 ACP semi-automatic handgun. According to a county coroner, powder burns indicated that both victims were shot at point blank range.[3] Also killed was student Angela Dales. Three students were wounded.

When Odighizuwa left the building where the shooting took place, he was approached by two students with personal firearms[4] and one unarmed student.[5] There are two versions of the events that transpired at that moment, one by Tracy Bridges and one by Ted Besen.

According to Bridges, at the first sound of gunfire, he and fellow student Mikael Gross, unbeknownst to each other, ran to their vehicles to retrieve their personally-owned firearms[6] placed in their glove compartments. Mikael Gross, a police officer from Grifton, North Carolina retrieved a 9 mm pistol and body armor.[7] Bridges, a county sheriff's deputy from Asheville, North Carolina[8] retrieved his .357 Magnum pistol from beneath the driver's seat of his Chevrolet Tahoe.[9] Bridges and Gross approached Odighizuwa from different angles, with Bridges yelling at Odighizuwa to drop his gun.[10] Odighizuwa then dropped his firearm and was subdued by several other unarmed students, including Ted Besen and Todd Ross.[11]

According to Besen, before Odighizuwa saw Bridges and Gross with their weapons, Odighizuwa set down his gun and raised his arms like he was mocking people.[12] Besen, a Marine veteran and former police officer in Wilmington, North Carolina, engaged in a physical confrontation with Odighizuwa, and knocked him to the ground. Bridges and Gross then arrived with their guns once Odighizuwa was tackled.[5] Additional witnesses at the scene stated they did not see Bridges or Gross with their guns at the time Besen started subduing Odighizuwa.[13] Once Odighizuwa was securely held down, Gross went back to his vehicle and retrieved handcuffs to detain Odighizuwa until police could arrive.

Police reports later noted that two empty eight round magazines designed for Odighizuwa’s handgun were recovered. Most sources (including those quoting Virginia State Police spokesman Mike Stater) state that when Odighizuwa dropped the gun the magazine was empty.[14] A report by another witness's hometown newspaper, a month after the shooting, suggested that the gun still held three cartridges.[15]

Aftermath[edit]

Initially in 2002, Odighizuwa was found to be incompetent to stand trial and was referred for psychiatric treatment. After three years of treatment and monitoring, in 2005, Odighizuwa was found mentally competent and pleaded guilty to the murders to avoid the death penalty. Odighizuwa received three life sentences and an additional 28 years without the possibility of parole.

The shooting was cited by John Lott[16] and others[17] as an example of the media's bias against guns, describing how the use of a firearm in a defensive role was not reported in most news stories of the event.[18]

After the shooting, students at the law school planted trees in memory of Sutin, Blackwell, and Dales on the school's front lawn. The school's student services office and scholarship program were named for Dales, along with County Highway 624 in Buchanan County, Virginia. Faculty fellowships at the school were named for Sutin and Blackwell.[19] The school's Phi Alpha Delta chapter is named for Sutin[20] while the Phi Delta Phi chapter is named for Blackwell.[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "'against all sense and reason" or Change and the Art of Getting Lucky" by W. Jeremy Davis, Dean and Professor of Law, Appalachian School of Law, Univ of Toledo Law Review Volume 34, Number 1, fall 2002. Retrieved April 17, 2007. Item on Odighizuwa is in footnote xxviii.
  2. ^ "Appalachian School of Law Killer Still Haunted by Paranoia, Delusions" by Chris Kahn, Associated Press. Retrieved August 25, 2007.
  3. ^ a b c "Suspect in law school slayings arraigned" USA Today, January 17, 2002.
  4. ^ The Bias Against Guns: Why Almost Everything You've Heard About Gun Control Is Wrong by John R. Lott, Regnery Publishing, Inc., 2003. This book's section on this shooting incidence is summarized at "Appalachian Law School Shootings, Media Crushes The Truth" by Ted Lang, the Price of Liberty Website. Retrieved April 17, 2007.
  5. ^ a b Man who confronted 2002 law school shooter says Gingrich wrong on arming students by Chris Kahn, the Associated Press, found at [1]
  6. ^ "Helping to Stop a Killer: Students Went After Law School Gunman" by Rex Bowman, Richmond Times Dispatch, May 5, 2002. Also "Ex-Charlottean: I Helped Nab Suspect" by Diane Suchetka, The Charlotte Observer, 2002-01-18, Page 2A.
  7. ^ "Shooting Hits Many Lives, Roanoke Times & World News (Roanoke, VA), January 20, 2002, page A-1. Story can be accessed at The Feed Directory. Retrieved April 17, 2007.
  8. ^ "Ex-Charlottean: I Helped Nab Suspect" by Diane Suchetka, The Charlotte Observer, 2002-01-18, Page 2A.
  9. ^ "Helping to Stop a Killer: Students Went After Law School Gunman" by Rex Bowman, Richmond Times Dispatch, May 5, 2002.
  10. ^ "Helping to Stop a Killer: Students Went After Law School Gunman" by Rex Bowman, Richmond Times Dispatch, May 5, 2002; also "Area officer helps wrestle law school gunman to ground" The Asheville Citizen-Times, Story can be accessed at The Feed Directory. Retrieved April 20, 2007.
  11. ^ "Law school, guns, and a media bias" by James Eaves-Johnson, The Daily Iowan January 24, 2002; Helping to Stop a Killer: Students Went After Law School Gunman" by Rex Bowman, Richmond Times Dispatch, May 5, 2002; "Ex-Charlottean: I Helped Nab Suspect" by Diane Suchetka, The Charlotte Observer, 2002-01-18, Page 2A.
  12. ^ Gun Lobby says media downplayed role of gun owners in subduing shooter," by Rick Montgomery, The Kansas City Star, March 6, 2002.
  13. ^ A Tragedy Compounded. Jim Oliphant, the Legal Times
  14. ^ "A Tragedy Compounded", Jim Oliphant, Legal Times, June 20, 2002. Retrieved April 18, 2007; also Roanoke Times January 17, 2002, and Lexington Herald leader January 18, 2002.
  15. ^ "Local man lives through recent shooting at college" by Carrie Sidener, The Elkin Tribune, Feb 13, 2002, accessed via archive.org August 13, 2012.
  16. ^ The Bias Against Guns: Why Almost Everything You've Heard about Gun Control is Wrong by John R. Lott, Regnery Publishing, 2003, page 27.
  17. ^ "When Guns Stop Crime, Media Attach Their Silencers" by Donny Ferguson, The Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk, Va.), February 4, 2002, page B11.
  18. ^ The Bias Against Guns: Why Almost Everything You've Heard about Gun Control is Wrong by John R. Lott, Regnery Publishing, 2003, page 27. "When Guns Stop Crime, Media Attach Their Silencers" by Donny Ferguson, The Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk, Va.), February 4, 2002, page B11. Arrogance: Rescuing America From the Media Elite by Bernard Goldberg, Warner Books, 2003, pages 185-87.
  19. ^ ASL January 16, 2002 Memorial. Retrieved August 25, 2007
  20. ^ Phi Alpha Delta Sutin Chapter. Retrieved August 25, 2007
  21. ^ Phi Delta Phi Blackwell Inn. Retrieved August 25, 2007

External links[edit]