Buddy Holly (album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Buddy Holly
Studio album by Buddy Holly
Released February 20, 1958
Recorded April 8, 1957 – January 26, 1958, Clovis, New Mexico, New York City
Genre Rock and roll
Length 24:35
Label Brunswick
Producer Norman Petty, Bob Thiele
Buddy Holly chronology
Buddy Holly
(1958)
That'll Be the Day
(1958)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars [1]
The Rolling Stone Record Guide 5/5 stars[2]

Buddy Holly is Buddy Holly's debut solo album and his second album overall (following The "Chirping" Crickets in 1957), released in February 1958. The personnel once again features Holly's band, the Crickets accompanying him. Approximately one year later, Holly was killed in a plane crash. It contains one of Holly's best known songs, "Peggy Sue". Some re-releases contain the tracks from Holly's next single; "Early In the Morning" b/w "Now We're One" as well as the B-side to his Rave On! single, "Take Your Time".

Track listing[edit]

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. "I'm Gonna Love You Too"   Joe B. Mauldin, Niki Sullivan, Norman Petty 2:14
2. "Peggy Sue"   Buddy Holly, Jerry Allison, Norman Petty 2:30
3. "Look at Me"   Buddy Holly, Jerry Allison, Norman Petty 2:07
4. "Listen to Me"   Buddy Holly, Norman Petty 2:22
5. "Valley of Tears"   Fats Domino, Dave Bartholomew 2:09
6. "Ready Teddy"   Robert Blackwell, John Marascalco 1:32
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. "Everyday"   Buddy Holly, Norman Petty 2:09
2. "Mailman, Bring Me No More Blues"   Ruth Roberts, Bill Katz, Stanley Clayton 2:12
3. "Words of Love"   Buddy Holly 1:56
4. "(You're So Square) Baby I Don't Care"   Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller 1:37
5. "Rave On!"   Sonny West, Bill Tilghman, Norman Petty 1:50
6. "Little Baby"   Buddy Holly, Norman Petty, C. W. Kendall Jr. 1:57

Personnel[edit]

The Crickets[edit]

Additional personnel[edit]

Charts[edit]

Single

Year Single Chart Position
1957 "Peggy Sue" Billboard Pop Singles 3

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allmusic
  2. ^ Marsh, Dave; Swenson, John (Editors). The Rolling Stone Record Guide, 1st edition, Random House/Rolling Stone Press, 1979, p. 173.