Canberra Girls' Grammar School

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Canberra Girls' Grammar School
Canberra Girls Grammar School crest. Source: www.cggs.act.edu.au (CGGS website)
Latin: Iuventuti Nil Arduum
To the young nothing is difficult[1]
Location
Deakin, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
Coordinates 35°18′59″S 149°6′53″E / 35.31639°S 149.11472°E / -35.31639; 149.11472Coordinates: 35°18′59″S 149°6′53″E / 35.31639°S 149.11472°E / -35.31639; 149.11472
Information
Type Independent, Day and Boarding
Denomination Anglican
Established 1926[2]
Chairman Belinda Moss
Principal Anne Coutts
Chaplain Rev. Paul Harris
Employees ~205[3]
Gender Co-educational – Early Learning to Yr2
Girls – Yrs 3-12
Enrolment ~1,600 (ELC–12)[4]
Colour(s) Red, Green, Navy Blue and White                 
Slogan BE YOURSELF
Website

Canberra Girls' Grammar School (CGGS) is an independent, Anglican, day and boarding school predominantly for girls, located in Deakin, a suburb of Canberra, the capital of Australia.

Established in 1926[2] as St Gabriel's School, by the Church of England[2] religious order, the Community of the Sisters of the Church,[3] Canberra Girls Grammar is the oldest private day and boarding school in Canberra.[5] It has a non-selective enrolment policy and caters for approximately 1,600 students, with co-education from Early Learning (preschool) to Year 2, and girls only from Years 3 to Year 12. Boarding facilities are available on the Senior Campus for up to 95 students in Years 7 to 12.[4] CGGS is also licensed to offer the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme and Diploma Programme (for Years 11 and 12).

Canberra Girls' Grammar School is affiliated with the Alliance of Girls' Schools Australasia (AGSA),[6] the Association of Heads of Independent Schools of Australia (AHISA),[7] the Australian Boarding Schools' Association (ABSA),[8] and is a member of the Association of Heads of Independent Girls' Schools (AHIGS).[9]

History[edit]

St Gabriel's School was established with nine students in 1926, as a day and boarding school for girls, by the Church of England[2] religious order, the Community of the Sisters of the Church[3] (the Kilburn Sisters). It catered for the small but growing community in what was designated as the new Federal capital.[2]

St Gabriel's School, 1928

From 1926 to early 1928, the Old Rectory of St John the Baptist Church, Reid, was leased from the Government by the Kilburn Sisters. The rectory was known as Glebe House, and was close to the city. In May 1927, the day before the opening of Parliament House, the foundation stone of the current site on Melbourne Avenue at Deakin, was laid by Dr Radford, Bishop of the then Diocese of Goulburn. The school officially moved into its new site in 1928. In 1933, the school was renamed Canberra Church of England Girls' Grammar School (CCEGGS).[2]

CCEGGS was nearly closed down during the Great Depression, and sold some of its land in order to remain solvent. A boom period in the 1970s saw the school expand, with the Junior School moving to a new Campus in Grey Street, Deakin, to cater for a surge in enrolments. Today the junior school remains on a separate campus within the suburb.[2] In 2001, the school name changed again, this time to its current form Canberra Girls Grammar School (CGGS). In 2004, CGGS opened an Early Learning Centre (preschool) catering for 3 to 5 year olds on its Junior School campus.[2]

Principals[edit]

Period Details[9]
1934–1937 Bessie Tomson Forster
May 1937 – 1947 Una Mitchell May
1947 (Acting) Doris Laity
1947–1962 Isabel Masters
1962–1965 Mavis June Prater
1966–1970 Evelyn Heath
1971–1973 Donald V. Selth
1974–1979 Jennifer Shaw
1980–1984 Helen Granowski
1984 (Acting) Elizabeth McKay
1985–1999 Elizabeth McKay
2000–2004 Alyson Groom
2003–2004 (Acting) Elizabeth Gilbert
2004 (Acting) Jane Pelvin
2005–2008 Susan Just
2009 (Acting) Bruce Handley
2009–2010 Susan Just
2010 (Acting) Bruce Handley
2011 – present Anne Coutts

Campus[edit]

CGGS viewed from Red Hill with Lake Burley Griffin in distance

Canberra Girls Grammar School is located over two campuses (primary and secondary) in the inner Canberra suburb of Deakin,[4] within view of Australia's Parliament House.[3] Combined, the campuses are 10 hectares (25 acres) in size, and include an indoor heated swimming centre, gymnasia, sports courts, playing fields, an aquatic centre on the shores of Lake Burley Griffin, and buildings catering for the performing arts, art and textiles.[10]

The School's most recent additions include a music centre with an adjoining 1,000-seat hall. 2006 saw improvements made to the junior school with the opening of six new classrooms, two music rooms and practice rooms and in 2010 the addition of a new multi-purpose hall, administration block, front office and staff offices. In the senior campus a new administration block, drive through and entrance was built in 2011 and a new award-winning science wing completed in 2012.

Curriculum[edit]

Canberra Girls Grammar School is now an International Baccalaureate World School authorised to offer the Primary Years Programme in the Junior School and the Diploma Programme in the Senior School.

Junior school[edit]

The junior school curriculum is based upon the New South Wales Department of Education Board of Studies syllabus.[11] It also has many co-curricular studies.

Senior school[edit]

Students in the senior school (Years 7 to 12) are prepared for the ACT Year 12 Certificate, as mandated by the Board of Senior Secondary Studies.[12]

A high percentage of students who graduate with a Year 12 Certificate also obtain an ATAR and go on to study at university. In 2007, of the 150 students awarded a Year 12 certificate, 91% were awarded Tertiary Education Statements. Also that year, the median ATAR gained by students was 86 compared with the average of students from all across ACT colleges of 79. Students from Canberra Girls Grammar School had the second highest median ATAR of the ACT colleges that year, and in 2009 they achieved the highest score. 92% of students from the school who were awarded Tertiary Education Statements in 2007 scored over 65 for their ATAR compared with 79% of all ACT students.[13]

House system[edit]

As with most Australian schools, Canberra Girls Grammar School utilises a house system for activities and competitions. The system forms the basis of its pastoral care programme.[14] Students in the senior school are divided into six houses:

  • Burgmann, named after the Right Reverend E H Burgmann, bishop of Canberra and Goulburn from 1950 to 1960
  • Deakin, named after the suburb in which the school is situated and former prime minister Alfred Deakin
  • Glebe, named after the building in which the school was first established
  • Kilburn, named after the suburb in London where the Mother House of the Order of Sisters of the Church was located
  • Robertson, named after Archdeacon C W Robertson
  • Waverley, named after the Sydney suburb of Waverley where the Mother House of the Order of Sisters of the Church in Australia was located.[14]

Notable alumnae[edit]

Alumnae of Canberra Girls Grammar School are known as Grammarians and can join the schools alumni association, the Grammarians' Association (GA). The GA was formed as the Old Girls' Union in 1931 and has branches around Australia and overseas.[15] Some notable Old Grammarians include:

Entertainment, media and the arts
Politics, public service and the law
Sport

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Welcome from the Principal". About CGGS. Canberra Girls Grammar School. 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "History". About CGGS. Canberra Girls' Grammar School. 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Report to Synod" (PDF). Canberra Girls Grammar School. Canberra Goulburn Synod. 2006. Archived from the original on 30 August 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  4. ^ a b c "Canberra Girls Grammar School". Canberra. School Choice. 2007. Archived from the original on 30 August 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  5. ^ "Canberra Girls' Grammar School". Seek Home. Seek. 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  6. ^ Butler, Jan (2006). "Member Schools". Members. The Alliance of Girls' Schools Australasia. Retrieved 16 August 2007. 
  7. ^ "Australian Capital Territory". AHISA Schools. Association of Heads of Independent Schools of Australia. November 2007. Archived from the original on 2 November 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  8. ^ "Canberra Girls' Grammar School". Schools. Australian Boarding Schools' Association. 2005. Archived from the original on 17 November 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  9. ^ a b "Heads of New South Wales Independent Girls' Schools". About AHIGS. Association of Heads of Independent Girls Schools. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  10. ^ "A Quick Glance". About CGGS. Canberra Girls Grammar School. 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  11. ^ "Curriculum". Junior School. Canberra Girls Grammar School. 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  12. ^ "Academic Curriculum". Senior School. Canberra Girls' Grammar School. 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  13. ^ "Overview – 2007: Year 12 Certificates and Tertiary Entrance Statements awarded" (pdf). ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies. 2007. Archived from the original on 28 May 2008. Retrieved 21 December 2007. 
  14. ^ a b "Student Handbook" (PDF). About CGGS. Canberra Girls Grammar School. 2007. pp. PP.18–25. Archived from the original on 3 September 2007. Retrieved 16 August 2007. 
  15. ^ "The Old Grammarians' Association". Community. Canberra Girls' Grammar School. 2007. Retrieved 16 August 2007. 
  16. ^ Clarke, Jenna. "'Gumleaf mafia' take over Panem". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 3 October 2013. 
  17. ^ "Rt Hon Patricia Hewitt MP". Speaker Biographies. Cabinet Office. 2007. Archived from the original on 17 August 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2007. 
  18. ^ "London 2012 - Zoe Buckman Athlete Profile". Retrieved 4 August 2012. 

External links[edit]