Cincinnati riots of 1829

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The Cincinnati Riots of 1829 were triggered by competition between Irish immigrants and the African American community for employment opportunities in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.[1] As a result, many African Americans left Cincinnati to found the Wilberforce Colony in Ontario, Canada.[2]

Between 1820 and 1829, migrants and fugitive slaves caused the black population in Cincinnati to grow from 433 to 2,258. On 30 June 1829 the township trustees issued a notice that told blacks they had to post bonds or they would be expelled from the town and from Ohio. During the month of July, whites started to attack blacks and destroy their property. Some moved, but others organized to defend themselves. Violence continued until late August, by which time almost 1,000 blacks had left the city. The town officials did little to defend the blacks until 24 August. On that day the Mayor, Jacob Burnet, dismissed charges against ten blacks who had been arrested and imposed fines on eight whites.[3]

After the riots, in order to escape persecution more than 1,000 blacks moved to Canada, namely the Wilberforce Colony.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Irish Ohioans". Ohio History Central. Ohio Historical Society. Retrieved 2010-10-28. 
  2. ^ Nikki Marie Taylor (2005). Frontiers of freedom: Cincinnati's Black community, 1802-1868. Ohio University Press. p. 50ff. ISBN 0-8214-1579-4. Retrieved 2010-10-28. 
  3. ^ Beverly A. Bunch-Lyons (2002). Contested terrain: African American women migrate from the South to Cincinnati, Ohio, 1900-1950. Routledge. p. 109ff. ISBN 0-415-93226-2. Retrieved 2010-10-28. 
  4. ^ Stradling, David (Oct 1, 2003). Cincinnati: From River City to Highway Metropolis. Arcadia Publishing. p. 28. Retrieved 2013-05-25.